banner


MSU environmental activities and accomplishments, from sources on and off-campus. For additional information on MSU environmental work, see these sources.

 


Politics, not severe weather, drive global warming views
MSU Today
12-1-2014

Scientists have presented the most comprehensive evidence to date that climate extremes such as droughts and record temperatures are failing to change people’s minds about global warming. Instead, political orientation is the most influential factor in shaping perceptions about climate change, both in the short-term and long-term, said Sandra Marquart-Pyatt, a Michigan State University sociologist and lead investigator on the study. “The idea that shifting climate patterns are influencing perceptions in the United States – we didn’t find that,” said Marquart-Pyatt, associate professor of sociology. “Our results show that politics has the most important effect on perceptions of climate change.” More»

Global warming cynics unmoved by extreme weather
MSU Today
11-24-2014

What will it take to convince skeptics of global warming that the phenomenon is real? Surely, many scientists believe, enough droughts, floods and heat waves will begin to change minds. But a new study led by a Michigan State University scholar throws cold water on that theory. Only 35 percent of U.S. citizens believe global warming was the main cause of the abnormally high temperatures during the winter of 2012, Aaron M. McCright and colleagues report in a paper published online today in the journal Nature Climate Change. “Many people already had their minds made up about global warming and this extreme weather was not going to change that,” said McCright, associate professor in MSU’s Lyman Briggs College and Department of Sociology. More»

 

Attitudes about knowledge and power drive Michigan's wolf debate
MSU Today
11-11-2014

A Michigan State University study, appearing in a recent issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management, identifies the themes shaping the issue and offers some potential solutions as the debate moves forward. The research explored how different sides of the debate view power imbalances among different groups and the role that scientific knowledge plays in making decisions about hunting wolves. These two dimensions of wildlife management can result in conflict and stagnate wildlife management. The results indicate that tension between public attitudes about local knowledge, and politics and science can drive conflict among Michiganders’ stance regarding wolf hunting, said Meredith Gore, associate professor of fisheries and wildlife and co-lead author of the study. More»

 

Understanding of world's freshwater fish, fishing too shallow
MSU Today
11-5-2014

In this month’s journal Global Food Security,scientists note that competition for freshwater is ratcheting up all over the world for municipal use, hydropower, industry, commercial development and irrigation. Rivers are being dammed and rerouted, lakes and wetlands are being drained, fish habitats are being altered, nutrients are being lost, and inland waters throughout the world are changing in ways, big and small, that affect fish. More»

 

Kaminski named interim director for MSU's Center for Research on Ingredient Safety
MSU Today
9-22-2014

Norbert Kaminski, director of Michigan State University’s Center for Integrative Toxicology, was recently named interim director for the university’s new Center for Research on Ingredient Safety. Kaminski, who is also professor of pharmacology and toxicology and a faculty member in MSU’s Cell and Molecular Biology Program, will continue as director of the Center for Integrated Toxicology until a permanent director is appointed for the ingredient safety center. More»

 

Boosting Armor for Nuclear-Waste Eating Microbes
MSU Today
9-12-2014

A microbe developed to clean up nuclear waste and patented by a Michigan State University researcher has just been improved. In earlier research, Gemma Reguera, MSU microbiologist, identified that Geobacter bacteria’s tiny conductive hair-like appendages, or pili, did the yeoman’s share of remediation. By increasing the strength of the pili nanowires, she improved their ability to clean up uranium and other toxic wastes. In new research, published in the current issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Reguera has added an additional layer of armor to her enhanced microbes. More»

 

How drones could limit fertilizer flow into Lake Erie
PBS NewsHour
9-10-2014

Dr. Bruno Basso's research using drones to help farmers apply fertilizers is featured on PBS NewsHour More»

 

MSU Researcher to build national microbial risk assessment training program
MSU Today
9-4-2014

MSU AgBioResearch biosystems engineer Jade Mitchell has received a nearly $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop and provide quantitative microbial risk assessment tools, models and training to university researchers around the nation. One of the goals of the program is to link quantitative scientists such as engineers to biologists and social scientists. More»

 

MSU Expert: Protect yourself from floodwater contamination
MSU Today
8-20-2014

Recent torrential rainfall across the United States has led to flash flooding, filling basements with water and sewage that can contain hundreds of pathogens. Joan Rose, Michigan State University's Homer Nowlin Chair in water research, advises that residents should assume floodwaters are contaminated and that exposure to these waters may raise the risk of diarrhea, dysentery, hepatitis, skin and eye infections, and respiratory disorders. - See more at: http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2014/msu-expert-protect-yourself-from-floodwater-contamination/#sthash.O1r2LBNi.dpuf More»

 

Addressing the effect of agriculture on global health
MSU Today
8-12-2014

Michigan State University has launched the first-of-its-kind center to research and address the growing global effects of agriculture on human and animal health. The Center for Health Impacts of Agriculture links MSU’s renowned agriculture and food security research with its three colleges of medicine – the College of Human Medicine, College of Osteopathic Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine – to address growing global health concerns with agriculture, including: Antimicrobial resistance in humans, animals and plants, and the implications on human health Agricultural development and economic effects related to increased cases of malaria in Malawi, Africa Health risk assessment and nutrient regulation policies, including assessment of carcinogen levels in current health policy Felicia Wu, John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor leads the new center. Wu’s research, at the crossroads of human health and agricultural practices and policies, inspired her to develop the interdisciplinary research center. More»

 

CANR announces two new chairs in Entomology and Fisheries and Wildlife
CANR
8-8-2014

F. William Ravlin and Scott Winterstein have been named chairpersons of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) departments of Entomology and Fisheries and Wildlife, respectively, by Dean Fred Poston. Ravlin’s appointment was effective Aug. 1; Winterstein started July 1. More»

 

MSU Professor Receives Grant to Battle Viral Food Pathogens
MSU Today
8-6-2014

Joan Rose, Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research at MSU, will use a nearly $300,000 grant to incorporate the latest next-generation genomic tools in efforts to reduce the number of food-borne outbreaks associated with fresh produce. The grant was awarded through the United States Department of Agriculture Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and administered through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Rose is a professor in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. More»

 

MSU helps shape USDA greenhouse gas policy
MSU AFRE
8-3-2014

Michigan State University researchers contributed to shaping the USDA’s report. They include: Phil Robertson, director of MSU’s Kellogg Biological Station’s Long-term Ecological Research Program and professor of plant, soil, and microbial sciences; Wendy Powers-Schilling, professor of animal science; and David Skole, professor of forestry. More»

 

Congressional Rift Over Environmental Protection Sways Public
MSU Today
8-1-2014

American citizens are increasingly divided over the issue of environmental protection and seem to be taking their cue primarily from Congress, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar. The gap between conservatives who oppose environmental protection and liberals who support it has risen drastically in the past 20 years, a trend seen among lawmakers, activists and – as the study indicates – the general public as well, said sociologist Aaron M. McCright. More»

 

Empowering the next generation of fisheries professionals
MSU Today
7-17-2014

Michigan State University’s Bill Taylor has received numerous awards and honors befitting an internationally recognized expert in Great Lakes fisheries ecology with a 35-plus-year career full of researcher discoveries and professional service. - See more at: http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2014/empowering-the-next-generation-of-fisheries-professionals/#sthash.pdVeY01t.dpuf More»

 

CSIS member contributes to land change synthesis paper
CSIS
7-9-2014

Much of what we know about how humans use land, and how those practices change over time, is informed by local case studies. But determining whether individual case studies are merely anecdotal—or if they can be scaled up to help explain regional or even global land use patterns—can be a challenge. To reconcile local information with regional–global knowledge, researchers who study land change must also reconcile the diversity of disciplines involved in land change science. From urban economics to geophysics and ecology to geography, each brings with it disparate data types and research questions. The research approach of synthesis—which “draws upon and distills many sources of data, ideas, explanations, and methods in order to accelerate knowledge production beyond that of less integrative approaches”—is especially useful in this context. “People who study land use change are often dealing with both quantitative and qualitative data, due to the human component of the field,” said Nicholas Magliocca, computational research associate at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC). “If you’re trying to integrate, for example, satellite remote sensing imagery with farmer surveys, your synthesis techniques will necessarily vary from those used for highly-controlled and standardized field experiments.” More»

 

Keep track of environmental news at MSU. Sign up for the News Round-Up today!

* required