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ESPP affiliated faculty and researchers come from 12 colleges and 40 departments. All are welcome to join: contact espp@msu.edu.

 

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Soji O. Adelaja
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
E-mail: adelaja@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/adelaja_a

Dr. Soji Adelaja is the John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor in Land Policy and Director of MSU's Land Policy Program. He is professor in the MSU Departments of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics; and Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies; and the School of Planning Design and Construction.

Dr. Adelaja is an eclectic scholar and team-builder whose research and outreach programs span a variety of areas, including the areas of land use, land policy, renewable energy (including wind power, metropolitan growth strategies, place science, prosperity science, New Economy growth modeling, political economy modeling and regional prosperity strategies in the New Economy. He is best known for his work in land use policy, agricultural and food policy at the urban fringe, asset-based economic development and emerging issues in the New Economy. His international work is focused largely on asset-based economic development strategies and economic placemaking for prosperity. A committed land grant scholar, his work has impacted on public policy in a variety of areas and he advises many leaders at the local, state, national and international levels.

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Evangelyn C. Alocilja
Department: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
E-mail: alocilja@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~alocilja

Our goal is to protect lives through point-of-care field-operable nanostructured biosensors for the rapid diagnosis of infectious disease agents which are of concern to public health, homeland defense, food supply chain, and economic infrastructures. Complementary to these nano-devices are anti-counterfeiting detection systems for product authentication, serialization, and tamper-evidency.

The biosensor designs we are currently working on include electrochemical and optical sensing platforms using antibodies, DNA fragments, and biomimetic receptors as the biological sensing elements. Rapid detection of pathogens has potential for minimizing the deadly organisms from being passed on up the food chain and preventing their transfer from the source to the table. Beneficiaries of the technologies are the consumers, food industries, farm industries, tourism, and the homeland. Direct benefits to Michigan and the United States include a safer food supply, cleaner water system, a healthier population, and more energetic work force. Such benefits will translate to a better society, economy, and environment.

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Annick Anctil
Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
E-mail: anctilan@msu.edu

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Soren Anderson
Department: Economics; Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics
E-mail: sta@msu.edu
Web site: http://econ.msu.edu/faculty/anderson/index.php

ESPP Profile

Soren Anderson is an Assistant Professor at MSU. He holds appointments in the Department of Economics and the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics. His research spans a broad range of topics in energy and environmental economics with a current focus on automobile fuel-economy standards, consumer preferences for biofuels, gasoline demand, and ethanol markets. He has previously served on the staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers and at Resources for the Future. Soren holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree in economics and mathematics from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Jeffrey A. Andresen
Department: Geography
E-mail: andresen@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/andresen.html

Jeff Andresen is an associate professor of meteorology/climatology in the Department of Geography and the State Climatologist for Michigan. He obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from Northern Illinois University in the field of meteorology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University in the field of agricultural meteorology/climatology. Dr. Andresen currently serves as director of the Michigan Climatological Resources Program, co-director of the Enviro-weather system, which supports agricultural pest, production, and natural resource management decision-making across Michigan, and administrator of the Michigan Automated Weather Network (MAWN), a network of automated weather stations designed to provide quality, detailed weather data to the state's agricultural industry over the Internet. The primary focus of Andresen's research has been the influence of weather and climate on agriculture, especially within Michigan and the Great Lakes Region. Current and past themes include; climatological trends and potential impacts, water use for agricultural irrigation, impacts associated with potential future changes in climate, weather and risk management in agricultural production systems, influence of land use changes on regional climate, winter hardiness and mortality of crops and insects, and the measurement and use of weather data for determination of plant disease risk.

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Rafael Auras
Department: Packaging
E-mail: aurasraf@msu.edu
Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~aurasraf/index.html

Our research group interest is directed towards:

  • the creation of new sustainable packaging. We are focusing on the development of new biobased polymer blends and composites, and their modifications.
  • the design of new active packaging systems.
  • the evaluation of the end of life scenario of different packaging systems. We consider different end of life scenarios such as composting and recycling, and evaluate the environmental footprint of packaging systems using state of the art laboratory techniques and tools such as life cycle assessment and systemic sustainability analysis.

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Mark L. Axelrod
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife, James Madison College
E-mail: axelrod3@msu.edu
Web site: http://jmc.msu.edu/contact/show.php?id=90

Mark Axelrod is Assistant Professor in James Madison College and the Department of Fisheries & Wildlife. Mark holds a PhD in Political Science from Duke University, and a law degree from Stanford University. His current research centers around: 1) relationships across issue areas in international relations, including the conditions under which Regional Fisheries Management Organizations address climate change; and 2) how governance structures affect transboundary ecological outcomes such as poaching, fishing, groundwater use, and electronic waste movement. His most recent work is published or forthcoming in Global Environmental Politics, Conservation & Society, and the European Journal of International Relations. Mark teaches courses on International Environmental Law and Policy, Democracy and Environment, Public International Law, and International Political Economy. He has served on MSU committees including the cross-college Water Organization committee. Mark also serves on the International Studies Association Environmental Studies Executive Committee, and was recently selected as a member of the program on "Legal Preparedness for Achieving the Aichi Biodiversity Targets", supported by the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and the International Development Law Organization.

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Jon F. Bartholic
Department: Institute of Water Research
E-mail: bartholi@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.hydra.iwr.msu.edu/iwr/cv/vita.asp?ID=1

Jon Bartholic is Director of the Institute of Water Research and Professor in the Departments of Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies and Crop and Soil Sciences. The Institute team works closely with local, county, state, regional, and federal government agencies and organizations focusing on water quality and land use in determining susceptible groundwater contamination areas and utilization of appropriate land use practices.

He has and continues to work closely with MSU colleagues on water quality and quantity issues, and land use and whole-farm planning from a watershed perspective. Most recently he has been working with others to develop an accessible integrated environmental information Web-based system including remote sensing and GIS technologies to aid users in making sound environmental, resource, and land use decisions.

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Bruno Basso
Department: Geological Sciences
E-mail: basso@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.glg.msu.edu/people/basso.html

ESPP Profile

Bruno Basso's research deals mainly with water, carbon, nitrogen cycling and modeling in agro-ecosystems, and spatial analysis of crop yield. Basso's modeling research has focused on extending soil-crop-atmosphere models to spatial domains at the field scale, and in particular on developing, testing, and deploying SALUS, a next-generation process-based model that integrates crop productivity with water, carbon, and nutrient fluxes in a spatially explicit manner. Through this research, it has been possible to integrate the effects of topography and soil properties on soil water balance, and thereby partition surface vs. subsurface flows in different landscape positions. This has important value for better understanding and predicting nitrogen conservation patterns in cropped landscapes as well as soil carbon change - and has led to important insights for the likely effects of climate change on carbon and water footprints of future cropping systems, as noted in recent publications.

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Janice A. Beecher
Department: Institute of Public Utilities
E-mail: beecher@msu.edu
Web site: http://ipu.msu.edu/about/staff.php

Dr. Beecher is the Director of the Institute of Public Utilities at MSU. She has twenty-five years of experience in public utility regulation and is responsible for Institute development, program management, and interdisciplinary research in support of the IPU's mission of service to the regulatory policy community. Her areas of interest include regulatory theory, institutions, and policy (especially related to water); regulatory ethics; incentives, pricing, and rate design; commission organization and demographics; and comparative utility industry analysis. Prior to joining the IPU, she was an independent policy consultant, and she also held senior research and adjunct faculty positions at The Ohio State University and Indiana University. She worked on staff as a policy advisor to the Chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission. Dr. Beecher has a Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University and adjunct appointments at MSU in Political Science and Economics; she teaches graduate courses in public policy and regulation in the Master of Public Policy Program.

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James R. Bence
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: bence@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~bence/

My position is part of the Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management. My research is in the general area of quantitative fisheries with an emphasis on Great Lakes applications. Recent work has focussed on evaluation of age-structured stock assesment methods and use of simulation models to evaluate different harvest policies and other management choices. My work has covered a broad range of topics including environmental impact assessments, bioenergetics applications, stock assessments and policy analyses for specific Great Lakes stocks, general assessment of methods, sea lamprey control/management, and population dynamics theory and modeling. I teach a graduate course in fish population dynamics.

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John C. Besley
Department: Advertising and Public Relations
E-mail: jbesley@msu.edu
Web site: http://cas.msu.edu/about-the-college/contact-us/faculty-and-staff-directory/297-john-besley

Dr. Besley’s research explores the relationships between media use, public engagement and health/environmental risk perceptions. His research has touched on public perceptions of nanotechnology, biotechnology, and energy technologies (particularly nuclear and hydrogen and fuel cell technologies). He has also been involved in research into journalistic norms related to coverage of public engagement. He is particularly interested in how exposure to decision-makers affects perceptions of new technologies with potential health or environmental impacts. This focus includes consideration of both mediated exposure through newspapers, television programs and web content, as well as face-to-face public engagement exercises such as mandatory public hearings or less traditional events meant to foster dialogue and deliberation. His work emphasizes the need to study both citizens’ perceptions of key decision-makers and decision-makers’ views about the public. As a teacher, Besley focuses on communication research methods, public opinion and persuasion, and science/risk communication.

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Ravi Bhavnani
Department: Political Science
E-mail: bhavnani@msu.edu
Web site: http://peacejustice.msu.edu/faculty

Ravi Bhavnani holds a Ph.D. in Political Science, an M.P.P, and a Degree Certificate in Complex Systems from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research explores the micro-level dynamics of mass participation in civil violence, with specific attention to the role of ethnicity. A large portion of his work uses agent-based computational modeling, in conjunction with empirical data, to examine the endogenous relationship between violence, individual characteristics, and behavior. His articles have have appeared in the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Politics, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Complexity, and Whitehead Journal of International Diplomacy. As an Environmental Faculty Fellow, Dr. Bhavnani's research will seek to identify key mechanisms and feedback loops underlying the eco-scarcity - conflict relationship at the sub-national level.

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Raechel Bianchetti
Department: Geography
E-mail: bnketti@msu.edu

Raechel Bianchetti is an assistant professor of remote sensing in the Department of Geography. She obtained her Bachelor of Science in Geography and Bachelor of Environmental Science degrees from the University of Idaho, and PhD degree from Pennsylvania State University in the field Geographic Information Science. The primary focus of Dr. Bianchetti’ s research are human factors of satellite image analysis, including expertise, perception, and decision-making with imagery. She is interested in both the development of expertise, and the role of expertise in image analysis of forested ecosystems.

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George W. Bird
Department: Entomology
E-mail: birdg@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/bird/tabid/133/Default.aspx

Dr. Bird is emeritus professor of nematology in the Department of Entomology. His research and academic instruction programs are focused on an ecosystem approach to Michigan agriculture and soil biology: with special reference to soil quality and nematode community structure. Dr. Bird participates in undergraduate and graduate education and numerous outreach programs throughout Michigan, U.S.A and Central Asia. As the former Director of the USDA Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program and Coordinator of the MSU Integrated Pest Management Program, he has experience interacting with numerous agriculture and science initiatives. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Rodale Institute and the Michigan Organic Food and Farm Alliance Board.

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Stephen A. Boyd
Department: Crop & Soil Sciences
E-mail: boyds@msu.edu
Web site: http://cit.msu.edu/faculty/boyd.html

Dr. Boyd's research is in the broad areas of environmental chemistry and microbiology. He studies the movement of organics in soil; microbial and catalytic degradation; sorption and degradation of organic contaminants, pesticides and metals in soils and sediments; and the remediation of contaminated soils, subsoils, and sediments.

Dr. Boyd's research program addresses use of chemically modified clays for sorption and/or catalytic degradation of organic contaminants and heavy metals. He also examines the interactions of organic toxicants with organic phases in soils, and with clays. One goal is the development of soil modification technologies to prevent migration of organic contaminants. He looks at the biodegradation of xenobiotics; and the bioavailability of organic contaminants to pollutant-degrading bacteria.

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Henry Brimmer
Department: Advertising, Public Relations, and Retailing
E-mail: hbrimmer@msu.edu
Web site: http://cas.msu.edu/modules.php?name=Contacts&op=details&id=215&type=U&department_id=0&position_id=0

Henry Brimmer has been a graphic designer and educator for the past 25 years. He currently teaches graphic design through the College of Communication Arts & Sciences. He came to MSU a year ago from San Francisco via Utah and Illinois, and wishes to involve his students in projects related to environmental issues. Currently his students are working on projects for the student organic farm.

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Daniel A. Bronstein
Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation & Resource Studies
E-mail: bronstei@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.carrs.msu.edu/Main/People/faculty%20bios%5Cbronstei.asp

Daniel Bronstein’s interests are in the area of environmental policy and law. He is active in such areas as standard setting for hazardous chemicals (through MSU’s Institute for Environmental Toxicology), impact assessment and health. In recent years he has become involved in evaluating major dam projects in foreign countries (Three Gorges, Sardar Sarovar) and, through that work, has become interested in issues of sustainable development and ecotourism.

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Lars Brudvig
Department: Plant Biology
E-mail: brudvig@msu.edu
Web site: http://brudviglab.plantbiology.msu.edu/

ESPP Profile

I am a community ecologist interested the consequences of anthropogenic change for plant biodiversity and the prospects for its restoration. My research bridges basic and applied ecology – I seek both the fundamental mechanisms underlying plant community patterns across time and space and the translation of this understanding into better restoration and land management. Much of my work is based around large, landscape ecology and restoration experiments. I work in a variety of ecosystems, ranging from Midwestern prairies, savannas, and woodlands, to pine forests in the Southeast, and with topics including: community assembly, habitat fragmentation, fire ecology, plant-animal interactions, landscape corridors, ecosystem ecology, and land-use legacies.

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Douglas D. Buhler
Department: Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station
E-mail: buhler@msu.edu
Web site: http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/staff.html#buhler

My research is centered on the development of integrated, ecologically-based weed management systems that reduce herbicide use and protect the natural resource base. This goal is approached through 1) determination of the influence of management practices and site characteristics on weed population dynamics and the weed seed bank in the soil, 2) assessment of the interactions between weed population dynamics and effectiveness of cultural and chemical weed control practices, and 3) evaluation and development of decision support systems for integrated weed management with emphasis on weed emergence dynamics.

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Steven J. Bursian
Department: Animal Science
E-mail: bursian@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ans.msu.edu/ans/department_faculty_staff/507/dr._steven_bursian

Research interests include the toxic effects of polyhalogenated environmental contaminants on avian and mammalian species and the toxic effects of natural toxins such as mycotoxins on avian and mammalian species. The data generated by these studies have been used by state, federal and international regulatory and health agencies to set clean-up criteria for contaminated sites, to set drinking water standards for specific chemicals, to develop fish consumption advisories and to set allowable concentrations of chemicals in food products.

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Jennifer Carrera
Department: Sociology
E-mail: jcarrera@msu.edu

Jennifer Carrera recently completed her PhD in sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on the causes and consequences of impaired access to water and sanitation among low income populations. For her doctoral research she conducted ethnographic research on water and sanitation struggles in Detroit, Michigan and Lowndes County, Alabama. Dr. Carrera recently completed a Master of Science degree in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, for which her thesis research examined how engineers draw from different disciplines to develop sanitation technology interventions in developing countries.Previously, Dr. Carrera received a Master of Science degree from Emory University in biostatistics, for which she examined healthy practices of U.S. medical students and their counseling behaviors, domestic violence in Cambodia, and female genital cutting in Egypt. Dr. Carrera¹s future work will explore the health impacts of impaired water and sanitation access among low income populations in economically developed settings, like the United States. She is particularly interested in the emergence of neglected infections of poverty in the context of developed nations.

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Jiquan Chen
Department: Geography
E-mail: jqchen@msu.edu

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Kendra S. Cheruvelil
Department: Lyman Briggs College and Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: ksc@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~ksc/

ESPP Profile

I am a landscape limnologist who works collaboratively to examine the roles that disturbance (human and natural), spatial scale, and heterogeneity have on lake biology and chemistry. I address questions that advance scientific understanding and are directly applicable to aquatic ecosystem management and conservation. In addition, my research explicitly includes the economic and social factors that both impact lakes and drive their management and conservation. My main areas of interest include examining the role of a) aquatic plants (native and alien) and their management in lake foodwebs and b) the landscape in structuring lake biology and chemistry. My students, collaborators, and I use a variety of approaches to conduct our research, such as lake field surveys, mesocosm experiments, and statistical modeling (e.g. multi-level modeling).

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Sophan Steven Chhin
Department: Department of Forestry
E-mail: chhin@msu.edu
Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~chhin/

Dr. Sophan (Steve) Chhin is an assistant professor of silviculture (applied forest ecology) and forest ecosystem productivity. He has a Ph.D. in forest biology and management from the University of Alberta, Canada, a master's degree in ecology from the University of Manitoba, and a bachelor's of science in biology and biochemistry from the University of Winnipeg.

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Karen Chou
Department: Animal Science
E-mail: chouk@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ans.msu.edu/ans/department_faculty_staff/507/dr._karen_chou

Dr. Chou's major interest of research is environmental toxicology, with an emphasis on regulatory pathways that control the reproductive functions in mammalian species. Her research team examines the impact of environmental pollutants on reproductive and developmental health in human and animals. She has discovered new control mechanisms of the onset of sperm fertilizing ability and provided evidences for acceleration of aging-related testicular degeneration after early-life exposure to the Great Lakes contaminant and estrogenic compounds.

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Peter O. Cookingham
Department: Turfgrass Information Center (MSU Libraries)
E-mail: cooking1@msu.edu
Web site: http://tic.msu.edu/staff.html

Pete Cookingham is currently the Project Director of the Turfgrass Information Center (TIC) within the MSU Libraries. TIC produces the Turfgrass Information File (TGIF) an online resource supporting turf science and culture (see tic.msu.edu). Prior to his arrival at MSU, his academic and work life were in recreation and park administration, including 3 years with the Peace Corps in Lesotho, Southern Africa; although his MS is in Library & Information Science from the University of Illinois. Some ongoing interests include communicating across the research/management gap; information access to underserved (and underorganized) literatures within applied natural resource disciplines, and why your lawn is bigger than mine.

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Thomas G. Coon
Department: Michigan State University Extension
E-mail: coont@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msue.msu.edu/portal/default.cfm?pageset_id=25744&page_id=25758&msue_portal_id=25643

My research interests focus on the interactions within aquatic ecosystems – physical and biological – that influence population dynamics of fish. I have worked in a variety of aquatic systems, ranging from small headwater streams to large rivers and from southern impounded rivers to the Great Lakes and coral reefs. Most recently, I have investigated the influence of stream dynamics on early life history of migratory salmonids in Lake Michigan and the influence of coastal wetland dynamics on early life history of fishes in Lake Huron.

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Evelyne Cudel
Department: Philosophy
E-mail: cudel@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.philosophy.msu.edu/people/faculty/evelyne-cudel/

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Alison M. Cupples
Department: Civil & Environmental Engineering
E-mail: cupplesa@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~cupplesa/

Microbial degradation of soil and water contaminants. Dehalogenation of the groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene and their reductive dechlorination products, cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. The development and use of molecular methods to identify and quantify the microorganisms responsible for environmental contaminants. Fate of pharmaceuticals during wastewater treatment and land application of biosolids.

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Bruce Dale
Department: Chemical Engineering & Materials Science
E-mail: bdale@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/people/profile/bdale

Professor Dale's research and professional interests lie at the intersection of chemical engineering and the life sciences. Specifically, he is interested in the environmentally sustainable conversion of plant matter to industrial products- fuels, chemicals and materials- while meeting human and animal needs for food and feed. He led a National Research Council report entitled "Biobased Industrial Products: Research and Commercialization Priorities" which was published in May 2000. Dr. Dale has authored over 100 refereed journal papers and is an active consultant to industry. He holds thirteen U. S. and foreign patents.

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Frank B. Dazzo
Department: Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, Crop & Soil Sciences
E-mail: dazzo@msu.edu
Web site: http://mmg.msu.edu/86.html

I conduct basic and applied research on beneficial plant-bacteria associations of agricultural importance, especially those involving the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Rhizobium. A main focus has been on elucidating the events leading to successful infection of clover roots by the Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii microsymbiont, and the subsequent development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We also investigate a newly described natural association between Rhizobium and cereals (e.g., rice and wheat), and are exploring ways to increase cereal production under real-world agronomic conditions by exploiting the benefits of this plant-microbe association. A second research focus is the development of CMEIAS, a new generation of interactive computer software that combines the resolving power of microscopy with digital image analysis to strengthen microscopy-based approaches for understanding microbial ecology in situ at single cell resolution. Various natural and managed communities and a wide range of digital microscopies are being used for that work.

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Tom (Thomas) M. Dietz
Department: Sociology, Environmental Science and Policy Program
E-mail: tdietz@msu.edu
Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/faculty/profile/dietz-thomas/

Thomas Dietz is a Professor of Sociology and Environmental Science and Policy and Assistant Vice President for Environmental Research at Michigan State University. He holds a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis, and a Bachelor of General Studies from Kent State University. At MSU he was Founding Director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program and Associate Dean in the Colleges of Social Science, Agriculture and Natural Resources and Natural Science Dr. Dietz is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has been awarded the Sustainability Science Award of the Ecological Society of America, the Distinguished Contribution Award of the American Sociological Association Section on Environment, Technology and Society, and the Outstanding Publication Award, also from the American Sociological Association Section on Environment, Technology and Society and the Gerald R. Young Book Award from the Society for Human Ecology. At the National Research Council he has served as chair of the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change and the Panel on Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making, and currently is Vice Chair of the Panel on Advancing the Science of Climate Change of the America's Climate Choices study. Dr. Dietz has also served as Secretary of Section K (Social, Economic, and Political Sciences) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is the former President of the Society for Human Ecology. He has co-authored or co-edited eleven books and more than 100 papers and book chapters. His current research examines the human driving forces of environmental change, environmental values and the interplay between science and democracy in environmental issues. Dr. Dietz is an active participant in the Ecological and Cultural Change Studies Group at MSU.

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Tracy A. Dobson
Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: dobson@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~dobson/

Co-management of natural resources in Malawi Tribal treaty fishing rights in the Great Lakes bordering Michigan; Tribal treaty rights to exploit inland resources in Michigan; Great Lakes women conservationists; Institutional and policy frameworks of the Great Lakes Basin.

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Erin Dreelin
Department: Center for Water Sciences
E-mail: dreelin@msu.edu
Web site: http://cws.msu.edu/about_us/people.html

Dr. Dreelin received her PhD in Ecology from the University of Georgia in 2004. Her research focuses on sustainable development and innovative stormwater management practices to protect aquatic ecosystems. Dr. Dreelin’s work also has a strong emphasis on outreach. She works with local governments to revise building codes in order to improve land development practices and to encourage low impact development and Smart Growth techniques.

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Lawrence T. Drzal
Department: Chemical Engineering & Materials Science
E-mail: drzal@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.chems.msu.edu/people/profile/drzal

Professor Drzal's research is directed at exploring materials and processes that are efficient, useful for structural applications and environmentally friendly. This includes materials, interfaces and processing that are centered on both petroleum based and biobased polymers; inorganic and biobased reinforcements, nanoreinforcements and processes to fabricate them into composite materials. One area of research underpinning all of these activities is research into the fundamentals of adhesion. Some potential process technologies under active investigation are ultraviolet light, microwave, electron beam and powder processing. Major research is being undertaken to develop biobased, sustainable, structural biocomposites that can replace petroleum based structural composites. This includes new biobased biofiber reinforcements from plants, bioplastics from plant chemicals, and new methods for processing biocomposites with high reinforcement contents and surface treatments for optimization of biocomposite properties.

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Diane Ebert-May
Department: Plant Biology
E-mail: ebertmay@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.plantbiology.msu.edu/faculty/faculty-research/diane-ebert-may/

As a plant ecologist, I conduct long-term ecological research (LTER) on alpine tundra plant communities on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. My interest in the complex interactions occurring in alpine plant communities in response to global change combined with my commitment to undergraduate biology education, lead to the expansion of my research program to include questions about the teaching and learning of biology. The research our group pursues requires linking the concepts and processes of biology to theories and processes of cognitive science with emphasis on how students construct understanding of the discipline. We use the methods of discipline-based science research that allow for investigating course and curriculum development, assessment, and pedagogy.

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Kevin Elliott
Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: kce@msu.edu
Web site: http://lymanbriggs.msu.edu/faculty/bios/user.cfm?UserID=121

Kevin Elliott received his PhD in History and Philosophy of Science from the University of Notre Dame. His research lies at the intersection of the philosophy of science and practical ethics. Many of the case studies that he has studied involve controversial areas of contemporary research on environmental pollution (e.g., endocrine disruption, multiple chemical sensitivity, hormesis, nanotoxicology) that are relevant to public policy. His current projects can be divided roughly into the following areas: Investigating the roles of ethical and social values in environmental research Exploring how to respond to financial conflicts of interest in research Studying ethical issues surrounding science communication Investigating how to motivate public action to address environmental issues Exploring ethical issues surrounding emerging technologies Examining the process of scientific discovery, including “exploratory experimentation” as well as the nature and significance of scientific errors and anomalies

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Kyle T. Evered
Department: Geography
E-mail: ktevered@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/evered.html

Kyle Evered's research interests involve political ecologies and environmental histories found in Eurasia. Some of his recent projects have dealt with: small-scale farmers, their ecologies, and their views regarding potential impacts of Turkey becoming part of the European Union; the ecologies and geopolitics of poppy production in Eurasia, past and present; and, challenges for wetland conservation and local ecologies amid pressures for development.

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Wesley Everman
Department: Crop and Soil Sciences
E-mail: everman@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.css.msu.edu/People.cfm

Weed science; Extension specialist for weed control in corn, bio-energy crops, forages, and potatoes; investigating chemical weed control, weed-crop competition, site-specific weed management, integrated weed management, and economically sustainable programs.

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Anne E. Ferguson
Department: Anthropology
E-mail: fergus12@msu.edu
Web site: http://anthropology.msu.edu/blog/people/fergus12/

Anne Ferguson, Professor and Director of the Women and International Development Program, does research and teaching in the areas of development studies, gender, agricultural and environmental change, and medical anthropology. In the mid-1980s Dr. Ferguson shifted her research focus to Southern Africa where she has studied development initiatives in the areas of agriculture, fisheries, and water sector reform. Her research in Malawi centers on the gendered social construction of agricultural technology and natural resource management programs and policies. Dr. Ferguson has studied the social and cultural factors which underpin the maintenance of crop bio-diversity, examining how these factors shape agricultural technology improvement programs. She also has examined the social impacts of fisheries policies in Malawi. Currently, her research centers on the gender dimensions of Malawi’s new water reform policies. Much of Dr. Ferguson’s research has been carried out in collaboration with colleagues at MSU and at the University of Malawi. Her research has been supported by the McArthur Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, Rockefeller Foundation, and USAID. In 2000, she received a Fulbright Hays Faculty Research Abroad Program grant to study the gender dimensions of Malawi’s and Zimbabwe’s water reforms.

Dr. Ferguson is one of the co-founders of the Gender, Justice and Environmental Change Graduate Specialization. Dr. Ferguson teaches gender studies courses with a focus on agriculture, environment and development.

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Matt Ferkany
Department: Teacher Education
E-mail: ferkany@msu.edu
Web site: http://education.msu.edu/search/Formview.aspx?email=ferkany@msu.edu

ESPP Profile

Matt Ferkany is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education. Obtaining a Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, his work focuses on virtue, well-being, environmental ethics, and civic and moral education. He is currently working on a project (with Kyle Powys Whyte) funded by the Spender Foundation articulating and defending a normative ideal for environmental ethics and education in primary and secondary schools. His work is published in journals such as Environmental Values, Ethics, Policy, and Environment, Journal of Agriculture and Environmental Ethics, Journal of Philosophy of Education, and the Southern Journal of Philosophy. He is co-chair elect of the Sustainability Education special interest group of the North American Association for Environmental Education.

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Scott D. Fitzgerald
Department: Pathobiology & Diagnostic Investigation
E-mail: fitzgerald@dcpah.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.pathobiology.msu.edu/people/fitzgerald.html

I am an anatomic veterinary pathologist with 15 years experience in infectious disease, toxicology and comparative pathology. I have board certification by both the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and the American College of Poultry Veterinarians. My expertise spans most of the animal kingdom (fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds, mammals). Experience with experimental studies in animals has included a variety of species: domestic birds (chickens, turkeys, pheasants), wild birds (crows, starlings, pigeons, mallard ducks), fish (goldfish, medaka, carp, minnows), and laboratory and wild mammals (mice, rats, voles, opossums, rabbits, mink, dogs, cats). I have worked with animal models for both viruses and bacteria, and studied toxicants including man-made organic compounds, heavy metals, plant and fungal toxins. Organ systems of special interest include the respiratory, lymphoid and urinary systems. I have conducted many animal studies involving Bio-Safety Level III agents at the University Research Containment Facility. Through my appointment in the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health (DCPAH) I have extensive experience with infectious disease diagnosis in food animals, companion animals and wildlife. I serve as the leader of the Diagnostic Laboratory’s surveillance programs for Tuberculosis in Wildlife and Salmonid Diseases, and collaborate on the West Nile Virus and Chronic Wasting Disease surveillance programs. My interest in animal disease extends to the population and ecosystem levels, and I am particularly interested in zoonotic and emerging diseases.

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Pennie G. Foster-Fishman
Department: Psychology
E-mail: fosterfi@msu.edu
Web site: http://psychology.msu.edu/Faculty/FacultyMember.aspx?netid=fosterfi

Pennie G. Foster-Fishman is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in organizational/community psychology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her research interests primarily emphasize organizational and community development and change, particularly those processes that can improve how services can better meet the needs of children, youth, and families. Toward this end, she has investigated human service delivery reform, multiple stakeholder collaboration, coalition development, community organizing, and resident empowerment as vehicles for change. She has also worked with a variety of human service delivery and not-for-profit organizations, working to improve their organizational operations, their work environment, and the efficacy of their service delivery. She has also worked with a variety of community-based coalitions, aiming to improve their collaborative processes and outcomes. Foster-Fishman has recently organized a Faculty Learning Community on the Scholarship of Engagement at Michigan State University. This Learning Community hopes to promote the understanding and valuing of university/community collaboration and community-based scholarly endeavors. Currently, she is leading a longitudinal evaluation of a comprehensive community initiative intended to promote individual, family, neighborhood, and community well-being.

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Russell D. Freed
Department: Crop & Soil Sciences
E-mail: freed@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~freed

My research looks at the role of agriculture in international development. I have extensive experience in international research management, design and evaluation. I also have a plant-breeding program in oats and canola. My research utilizes genetics to reduce pesticide use in our food system.

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Eric Freedman
Department: Knight Center for Environmental Journalism
E-mail: freedma5@msu.edu

Eric Freedman is Knight Chair, director of the Knight Center for Environmental Journalism and an associate professor in the School of Journalism. As director of MSU Capital News Service, he writes and edits environmental news stories for the center Great Lakes Echo and carries Echo stories to its 25 member publications. He has headed the J-School Australia Media, Environment, Culture & Tourism study abroad program and MSU Scotland media and environment Freshman Seminar Abroad and served as MSU associate dean of International Studies & Programs. As a Fulbright Scholar, he co-developed and taught the first university-level course on environmental and science journalism in Uzbekistan. and conducts research about environmental journalism and coverage of environmental issues in the former Soviet republics of Central Asia. As a journalist, his interests include public lands, habitat and diversity, invasive species, eco-tourism, forests, international transborder environmental problems, fisheries, environmental enforcement and archaeology. His books include On the Water, Michigan and Great Lakes, Great National Forests: A Recreational Guide. During his 20-year reporting career he covered public affairs and legal affairs for newspapers in New York and Michigan, winning a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of a legislative corruption scandal.

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Doug Gage
Department: Bioeconomy Network
E-mail: gage@msu.edu

Doug Gage is the Director of the Michigan State University BioEconomy Network in the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies. This organization was established to coordinate MSU’s diverse assets in basic science, technology development, economic analysis, policy, education and outreach to pursue new federal and corporate research opportunities, and to influence the development of the local, regional and national bioeconomy. He has primary responsibility for bioenergy and bioeconomy issues related to research and serves as the primary administrative point of contact for the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, the major DOE-funded project with the University of Wisconsin to develop next generation biofuels. Previously, Gage served on the faculty of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 1990-2002. His research focused on metabolic engineering of plant biochemical pathways related to water stress adaptation.

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Stephen P. Gasteyer
Department: Sociology
E-mail: gasteyer@msu.edu
Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/faculty/profile/gasteyer-stephen/

ESPP Profile

Stephen Gasteyer, assistant professor of Sociology, researches the structures and processes that influence community level access to critical natural resources and capacity to manage those resources. His work currently looks at:

  • The role of coalitions, social networks and social capital in the protecting water quality;
  • Community capitals, coalitions, and the development of sustainable food systems;
  • The factors that impact the capacity of communities to implement and manage water and wastewater infrastructure systems;
  • The role of advocacy coalitions and social networks in water management and the development of coupled hydrologic, economic, and social network models for understanding of surface water-groundwater interactions for protection of instream flows.

His research focuses on the US, Middle East and West Africa.

Stephen received a BA from Earlham College in 1987, and a Ph.D. in Sociology from Iowa State University in 2001.

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Carole E. Gibbs
Department: Criminal Justice and Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: gibbsca1@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.conservationcriminology.msu.edu/people/gibbs.php

ESPP Profile

Dr. Gibbs is an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University with a joint appointment in the School of Criminal Justice and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. Her research foci include corporate environmental performance; international trade in electronic waste; carbon trading and related fraud; environmental justice; lead exposure; and neighborhoods and crime.

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Lynne G. Goldstein
Department: Anthropology
E-mail: lynneg@msu.edu
Web site: http://anthropology.msu.edu/blog/people/lynneg/

Lynne Goldstein is an archaeologist who has focused the majority of her research on Wisconsin and the Great Lakes region. She has worked extensively with Native American tribes in Wisconsin and elsewhere, and in addition to a regionally based, environmentally focused research program in Southeastern Wisconsin, Goldstein has examined late prehistoric societies and their mortuary practices. Her work on mortuary analysis has included both prehistoric and historic sites, Native American and European. She has done extensive, collaborative work with geologists on landscape use and change over time, as well as projects focused on the geomorphology of specific sites.

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Meredith L. Gore
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife, School of Criminal Justice
E-mail: gorem@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~gorem

I joined MSU’s Department of Fisheries & Wildlife and School of Criminal Justice in January 2008. My formal training is in the human dimensions of wildlife management, and environment and resource policy. My research interests focus on public perceptions of wildlife and environmental risk, human-wildlife conflict, community-based natural resource management, human dimensions of natural resource management, conservation criminology, and program evaluation.

Selected research projects include:

  • Risk perception, vulnerability, and compliance behavior associated with human-wildlife conflict in Namibia
  • Moral commitments about genetically rescuing Isle Royale’s wolf population
  • Conservation implications of seeking risk information about diving with white sharks
  • Values, norms, and risks associated with bovine tuberculosis in Michigan and Minnesota

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Jeffrey T. Grabill
Department: Writing, Rhetoric & American Cultures
E-mail: grabill@msu.edu
Web site: http://wrac.msu.edu/person/grabill/

My research focuses on how to communicate with diverse audiences with respect to technical and scientific issues. In disciplinary terms, I work at the intersection of professional and technical writing, rhetorical theory, and literacy theory. I am interested in the literate and technological practices of citizens, users, workers, students, and other such people within complex institutional contexts. These interests have necessitated a concern with issues of public policy and the rather “mundane” procedures that lead to public policy, such as decision making about risk and health, the activities of citizen groups, and the plans of local communities and governments. My current work focuses on the ways in which information technologies are used (or not) to aid inquiry, decision making, and citizen action. This work deals with the design and use of information technologies as well as the rhetorical strategies non-expert audiences use to communicate in public contexts.

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Sue C. Grady
Department: Geography
E-mail: gradys@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/grady.html

The focus of my research is medical (health) geography, human ecology, spatial epidemiology, and health disparity research. I utilize geographic information system applications and multilevel modeling to conduct exposure and health assessments. I am currently focusing on estimating spatial/geographic variations in adverse birth outcomes with respect to demographic, socioeconomic and environmental risk factors. I have a Master of Public Health degree in International Health and an interest in epidemiologic and health transition theory and policy and planning implications.

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Matthew Grieshop
Department: Entomology
E-mail: grieshop@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/grieshop/tabid/144/Default.aspx

ESPP Profile

I joined the MSU department of Entomology in October of 2007 as the new Organic Pest Management faculty member. My responsibilities include research (50%), extension (25%), and teaching (25%) in the areas of organic agriculture and pest management. Although I am housed in Entomology I also have a strong interest in the management of weeds and pathogens and have several ongoing projects exploring how plant, insect, and pathogen pests interact with each other or with specific pest management tactics. My appointment is especially broad in that I am not restricted to a specific commodity group (i.e. fruit, field crops, vegetables, animal science, floriculture, etc.), rather my area of emphasis is on pest management issues in organic agriculture. The overall goal of my research and extension efforts are to develop, refine, and deliver pest management technologies that minimize off farm inputs while preserving farm economic sustainability.

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Robert J. Griffore
Department: Family & Child Ecology
E-mail: griffore@msu.edu
Web site: http://families.msu.edu/FacultyBrowser.aspx?CategoryID=48

Some recent and current interests in the realm of scholarship and research include:

  • Publication of a book on human ecology from a general systems point of view
  • The ecology of bovine tuberculosis in Michigan – with special focus on Michigan farm families and on Michigan veterinarians
  • Children's environmental health
  • Preschool children's knowledge of the natural environment
  • The school as an ecosystem and associated issues related to learning environments in the Detroit Public Schools

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Richard E. Groop
Department: Geography
E-mail: groop@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/Groop/Groop.html

Conducts research on applications of geographic information systems, computer map design, and income and migration in Michigan and the United States.

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Kay (Katherine) L. Gross
Department: Plant Biology and Kellogg Biological Station
E-mail: kgross@kbs.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/faculty/gross/

I am broadly interested in the causes and consequences of species diversity in plant communities, particularly grasslands. My current research focuses on how variation in soil resources influences species diversity and composition, particularly in grasslands. We currently have ongoing two large field experiments in native grassland in SW Michigan …I am also interested in the determinants and consequences of diversity in agricultural ecosystems. As a co-PI on the KBS LTER project I have been monitoring the long-term effects of different crop management systems on the diversity and composition of weed communities in row crops. …The LTER work combined with my research on native grasslands has given me a greater appreciation of the challenges inherent in restoring native species in degraded grassland. My students and I have begun to work with local resource managers to develop experimental approaches that can guide the restoration and management of native grasslands in this area.

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Geoffrey Habron
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife and Sociology
E-mail: habrong@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~habrong

Adaptive Approaches to Democratic Resource Management Inquiry; Community-based Adaptive Watershed Management (community-based conservation, adaptive management, watershed management, ecosystem management); whole systems thinking and practice; participatory action research and learning; integration of social and ecological factors in natural resource management; geographic information systems.

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Stephen K. Hamilton
Department: Zoology
E-mail: hamilton@kbs.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/faculty/hamilton/

My principal research interests involve ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry, with particular attention to aquatic environments and the movement of water through landscapes. I am especially interested in running waters, wetlands and floodplains. I also like to consider ecosystem processes at the landscape or watershed scale, and I prefer to do research that contributes to our understanding of environmental problems or improves our ability to manage ecosystems.

I am presently devoting much of my time to the study of various aspects of aquatic ecosystems in southern Michigan, including wetlands, streams, lakes, and watersheds. I also work on tropical ecosystems in South America and dryland river ecosystems in Australia.

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Joseph Hamm
Department: Criminal Justice
E-mail: jhamm@msu.edu

Joseph Hamm is Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Environmental Studies. A psychologist by training, his work lies at the nexus of institutions and the public where he investigates what trust is, how best to appropriately measure it, and it's connection to "outcomes" like cooperation and compliance. Although he continues to work with institutions like the courts and government, much of his work focuses on natural resource institutions. Natural resource issues are among the most important facing our world today. In the United States and much of the world, natural resource institutions play a critical role in meeting these challenges. In the United States, these institutions include federal and state authorities that often have considerable jurisdiction to create binding regulation (like the US Department of the Interior and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources) and private institutions like The Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund whose influence is often just as important. These institutions are critical for the coordinated efforts that are needed to effectively manage our natural resources but their success is often at least partially determined by the degree of cooperation and compliance they are able to elicit from important segments of the public. Joe's work investigating the conceptualization, measurement, and outcomes of trust seeks to help researchers and practitioners in effectively leveraging this critical construct for natural resources management.

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Jay R. Harman
Department: Geography
E-mail: harman@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/harman.html

I am interested in environmental ethics, with lesser emphases in climatology, plant geography of North America, and utilization of plant nectar sources by honeybees.

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Craig K. Harris
Department: Sociology
E-mail: harrisc@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~harrisc/

My background is in environmental sociology and sociological human ecology. Much of my research has focused on the social dimensions of the relationships between agriculture and the environment (especially pest management and fertility management), and on the social dimensions of the relationships between fisheries and the environment (especially fisheries management and technological change). I have also studied the linkages between energy and society, and the social dimensions of bovine tuberculosis. In my work on these various topics, I use a multilevel approach that looks at the interactions among the social psychology of human actors, the dynamics of communities and organizations, and the macro-level processes of culture and governance. As much as possible, I study reciprocal systemic interactions between social factors and elements at different scales of the biophysical environment.

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Syed A. Hashsham
Department: Civil & Environmental Engineering
E-mail: hashsham@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~hashsham/

Dr. Hashsham's research focuses on three closely related areas: i) understanding how complex microbial communities work, ii) development of parallel detection tools and low cost hand-held devices for gene-based diagnostics, and iii) development/evaluation of processes relevant to environmental biotechnology. Current projects focus on the development of hand-held gene analyzer, DNA biochips for parallel screening of pathogens, and approaches to enhance detection limit (e.g., using single photon detectors) and sample concentration and processing. Dr. Hashsham is also interested in developing mathematical tools to describe the behavior of mixed microbial communities.

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Daniel B. Hayes
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: hayesdan@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~hayesdan/

My primary research interest is to determine how fish habitat affects their population dynamics. By linking population dynamics with habitat, I hope to help fishery managers in their goal of sustaining valuable fisheries. In addition to this, I am also interested in the impact of fishing on fish populations, as well as the general ecology of fishes. To accomplish these interests, I generally take a mathematical modeling or statistical approach to problem solving. I also try to take advantage of opportunities to do whole-system manipulations as I feel this is one of the best ways to understand ecosystem functioning.

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Joseph Herriges
Department: Economics
E-mail: jah@msu.edu
Web site: http://econ.msu.edu/faculty/herriges/index.php/

Joe Herriges, professor of economics, AFRE and ESPP, is looking forward to the many opportunities Michigan State University has to offer, both in water resource research and in the broader areas of environmental and energy economics. The new faculty member spent 26 years as an environmental economics professor at Iowa State University, focusing much of his recent research on assessing the value that individuals place in environmental amenities, such as clean water or public parks.

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Robert Hitchcock
Department: Geography
E-mail: hitchc16@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.globalchange.msu.edu/rhitchcock.html

Robert K. Hitchcock is Professor of Geography and an adjunct faculty member of the Department of Anthropology. Over the past several decades, Hitchcock has served as a cultural anthropologist, archaeologist, and in international development consultant on issues ranging from indigenous peoples’ rights and land use planning to social impact analysis and community-based natural resource management, particularly in Africa and North America, with brief work in Central and South America. His focal areas of concern are human ecology, international socioeconomic development, resettlement, human rights of indigenous peoples, women, refugees, and minorities, and conflict resolution. Some of his work focuses on hunters and gatherers and deals with socioeconomic change among societies that engage in foraging for part of their livelihoods.

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John P. Hoehn
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
E-mail: hoehn@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/hoehn

John Hoehn’s teaching and research activities address the benefit-cost analysis of environmental improvements; methods for valuing non-market goods; improved institutions for protecting, managing, and using environmental resources; and the economics of ecological resources. He teaches core courses in the departmental and university-wide graduate programs in environmental and resource economics. Recent research projects include estimating the demands for water quality improvements in Michigan’s lakes and rivers; evaluating improved institutions and methods for ecosystem restoration; assessing the economic values of coastal wetlands; estimating willingness to pay for municipal water and wastewater services; and evaluating the economic alternatives for controlling hazardous wastes and toxic residues.

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Richard D. Horan
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
E-mail: horan@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/horan

Rick teaches natural resource economics. His research interests are in the areas of environmental and natural resource economics management and policy design. In particular, he concentrates on understanding feedbacks between economic and ecological systems and how these affect management opportunities. Specific interests include:

  • Bioeconomics
  • Management of endangered and threatened species and ecosystems
  • The co-evolution of economic and ecological systems
  • Prevention and control of invasive alien species
  • Infectious disease in wildlife
  • Agricultural pollution and conservation

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Phil H. Howard
Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation & Resource Studies
E-mail: howardp@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~howardp/

My research focuses on investigating the relationships between food, agriculture and public health, as well as assisting communities to characterize and respond to changes in the food system. My current projects focus on:

  • Consolidation in the food system, particularly in the rapidly growing organic sector
  • 'Food environments' and their potential influence on obesity and hypertension
  • National consumer interest in 'ecolabels' as a potential strategy for improving the livelihoods of small- and medium-scale farms.

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Zachary Y. Huang
Department: Entomology
E-mail: bees@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/huang/tabid/148/Default.aspx

Almost anything related to honey bees interests Huang. Current research topics include: effect of Nosema apis on worker behavior and physiology, reproductive biology of Varroa mites, cloning the sodium channel genes of the Varroa mite to determine if mutation of this gene is responsible for mite resistance to Apistan (in collaboration with Ke Dong), effect of transgenic pollen on health of honey bees and as possible agents for pest control, and the role of melatonin in regulating social behavior in honey bee workers. He is the webmaster of a popular web site on bees, cyberbee.msu.edu and teaches two courses (Insect Physiology and Apiculture and Pollination). He recently invented a new device for Varroa mite control and a patent was granted to MSU.

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Richard C. Hula
Department: Political Science
E-mail: rhula@msu.edu
Web site: http://polisci.msu.edu/index.php/people/faculty/item/faculty/richard-hula

My research focuses on broad issues of urban politics and public policy. I initially became interested in environmental policy as brownfields redevelopment was increasingly presented as a strategy for urban revitalization. My focus has since expanded on other brownfield issues including:

  • The process of bureaucratic change with respect to agency goals (public health to economic development)
  • The role of citizen involvement in redevelopment planning and implementation
  • Social justice issues in environmental policy
  • The interaction of "hard science" and environmental policy (particularly with respect to site standards)

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David W. Hyndman
Department: Geological Sciences
E-mail: hyndman@msu.edu
Web site: http://geology.msu.edu/people/hyndman.html

Our research explores the physical and chemical processes that influence groundwater flow and solute transport, and the factors that affect seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation. We combine multiple independent geophysical and hydrologic datasets through three-dimensional numerical simulations to estimate aquifer properties with high resolution. The influence of these properties on groundwater flow, solute transport, and bioremediation of organic contaminants is also an active area of research in our group. We also explore the influence of climate and land use changes on the flux of water and solutes through regional watersheds, and the influence of these factors on ecological health.

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Dana M. Infante
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: infanted@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~infanted

I am interested in understanding the influence of landscape features and processes on aquatic organisms and quantifying the mechanisms by which that influence occurs. My experience examining hierarchical relationships between landscape factors and stream ecosystem variables includes the study of indirect landscape controls on Michigan fish assemblages through effects on stream channel shape as well as a comprehensive study of landscape effects on fish and macroinvertebrates through multiple measures of habitat in stream catchments of southeast Michigan. I am interested in questions of spatial variability (i.e., do mechanisms vary with scale, by region?), and in the applicability of different analytical techniques for addressing these questions. Because successful protection and management of aquatic systems requires an understanding of mechanisms of impairment, I have a broad goal of performing research that benefits management while ensuring sustainability.

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Joshua E. Introne
Department: Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media
E-mail: jintrone@msu.edu
Web site: http://cas.msu.edu/people/faculty-staff/staff-listing/name/joshua-introne/

Josh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media. Dr. Introne holds masters and Ph.D degrees from the Computer Science Department at Brandeis University. During his graduate studies, he also worked as a scientist at Charles River Analytics to develop decision support platforms for a variety of government agencies. Before coming to TISM, Josh was scientist at the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, where he served as Chief Architect for the MIT Climate CoLab, a platform designed to crowdsource solutions to climate change. Josh is passionate about trying to make the world a better place by leveraging our collective intelligence, and eager to collaborate with students and other researchers who share this interest.

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Nan E. Johnson
Department: Sociology
E-mail: johnsonn@msu.edu
Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/njohnson.html

Nan E. Johnson holds a joint appointment in the Department of Sociology, where she teaches Social Demography, and in the Agricultural Experiment Station, where she conducts research. Her research intersects Demography, Gerontology, and Rural Sociology. Her work explores differences between rural and urban elders in the social production of disability and its remediation through assistive technology and personal help.

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Mike (Michael) L. Jones
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: jonesm30@msu.edu
Web site: http://glpd.fw.msu.edu/Mike/

My primary research interests center around understanding fish population dynamics and applying quantitative tools such as simulation modeling and decision analysis to practical fishery management problems. My research has a strong applied flavor, and frequently involves working closely with fishery management agencies. I am especially interested in the challenge of determining critical uncertainties for fishery management, and the related question of assigning an appropriate value to reducing uncertainty.

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Raymond Jussaume
Department: Sociology
E-mail: jussaume@msu.edu

Raymond Jussaume joined MSU in August of 2011 as Professor and Chair of the Department Sociology at Michigan State University. He previously was on the faculty of the Department of Community and Rural Sociology, as well as the Department of Natural Resource Sciences, at Washington State University. His academic training, which culminated with a Ph.D. from Cornell University, and research interests fit within the broad area of Development Sociology. Specifically, he is interested in macro level patterns of change, and how people at local levels can positively influence these patterns in order to generate a development trajectory that is beneficial and meaningful to them. Ray spent two years of his youth as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Niger, and much of his early research focused on the social, economic and political impacts of trade and investment in food and agriculture, with particular emphasis on the relationships between and within the United States and East Asia. This work served as the basis for an active outreach program to agriculturalists and community groups in Washington State. He has conducted field research in China, Japan and France. More recently, Ray has become involved in research on sustainability issues, including questions about food access and its relationship to community health issues, particularly in the context of the United States, Europe and Asia. He has taught a wide variety of classes at both the graduate and undergraduate level, including Community Sociology, Society and Natural Resources, Modern Japanese Society, Rural Sociology, Agriculture, Environment & Community, and Global Civilizations.

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Andrey Kalinichev
Department: Chemistry
E-mail: kalinich@chemistry.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.emn.fr/z-subatech/kalinich/

I have a joint appointment between the Departments of Chemistry and Geological Sciences. My current research interests include:(1) Computational molecular modeling of aqueous solutions, their interfaces with minerals and other natural and synthetic materials relevant to geochemical, environmental, energy and water resource applications; (2)Environmental materials chemistry; (3) Chemistry of geological carbon sequestration; (4)Supercritical fluids and their environmentally friendly technological applications

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Linda Kalof
Department: Sociology
E-mail: lkalof@msu.edu
Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/lkalof.html

Linda Kalof is Professor of Sociology, a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics and founder of the Michigan State University’s interdisciplinary graduate specialization in Animal Studies: Humanities & Social Science Perspectives.

Dr. Kalof studies the cultural representations of humans and other animals and the links between culture and nature. She has published more than 35 articles and book chapters and nine books including A Cultural History of the Human Body in the Middle Ages (Berg 2010), A Cultural History of the Human Body in the Renaissance (Berg 2010), Introduction to Social Statistics (Wiley/Blackwell, 2009), Essentials of Social Research (McGraw-Hill 2008), Looking at Animals in Human History (University of Chicago/Reaktion 2007), A Cultural History of Animals in Antiquity (Berg 2007),The Animals Reader (Berg 2007),The Earthscan Reader in Environmental Values (Earthscan 2005), and Evaluating Social Science Research (Oxford University Press 1996).

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Norbert E. Kaminski
Department: Pharmacology & Toxicology
E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.phmtox.msu.edu/people/faculty.html

Norbert Kaminski’s research interests are in the areas of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology. Currently, he has several ongoing research projects, each of which is focused on identifying the mechanisms by which specific agents alter normal responses of the immune system. One major research focus is to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which biologically active compounds derived from the Cannabis sativa plant, termed cannabinoids, and cannabinoid-like endogenous molecules alter T lymphocyte function. A second research emphasis is to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, including dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, alter B lymphocyte function. A third major research focus is to elucidate the immunological mechanisms involved in chemical- and protein-mediated allergic airway disease. The overarching research focus is to develop a better understanding of the alterations in signal transduction and gene expression induced by immunotoxicants compromising immune competence.

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Michael Kaplowitz
Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation & Resource Studies
E-mail: kaplowit@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~kaplowit/

Michael D. Kaplowitz has published more than two books, five book chapters, and 20 peer-reviewed articles in journals including American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Duke Environmental Law and Policy Forum, Ecological Economics, Journal of the American Water Resources Association, and the Journal of Environmental Planning & Management. Kaplowitz is PI or co-PI on more than $2 million of research grants in the areas of ecosystem valuation, watershed management, and land use. His current research includes a nationwide examination of wetland mitigation banking, a study of economic values of Great Lakes coastal wetland ecosystems, an investigation of the nation’s transfer of development rights programs, and some watershed-level studies of best management practices.

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Stan Kaplowitz
Department: Sociology
E-mail: kaplowi1@msu.edu
Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/faculty/profile/kaplowitz-stan/

Stan Kaplowitz is Professor of Sociology (Ph.D. U of Michigan). He specializes in social psychology, especially of attitudes and communication. He also applies quantitative methods to predicting risk of lead poisoning from environmental and socio-demographic data. His current research direction focuses on attitudes and behavior regarding climate change.

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Eva Kassens
Department: School of Planning, Design, and Construction and Global Urban Studies Program
E-mail: ekn@msu.edu
Web site: http://sites.google.com/site/ekassens/

ESPP Profile

Eva Kassens is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Transport Planning in the School of Planning, Design, and Construction (SPDC). She holds a joint appointment with the Global Urban Studies Program (GUSP). Her research centers on sustainability and large scale urban planning projects that are triggered by global forces, including climate change. Interests include transport planning for extreme events, urban planning and policy during rapid urban change processes, international planning, disaster prevention and recovery, and emergency preparedness.

Eva was born in Germany and has lived in Sydney, London, Barcelona, Lausanne, Athens, and Boston. She graduated in 2009 from MIT with a Ph.D. in Urban Planning (Department of Urban Planning and Studies) and a S.M. in Transportation (Civil and Environmental Engineering). She also received her degree (Diplom-Ingenieur) from the Universität Karlsruhe (TH) in Business Engineering.

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James J. Kells
Department: Crop and Soil Sciences
E-mail: kells@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.css.msu.edu/People.cfm

Dr. Kells' research and extension program focuses on integrated weed management, biology and ecology of perennial weeds, and weed interference. His program emphasizes weed management in corn, forage crops, and small grains.

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John M. Kerr
Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation & Resource Studies
E-mail: jkerr@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.carrs.msu.edu/faculty/viewPage.php?netID=jkerr

John Kerr received his PhD in applied economics in 1990 at the Food Research Institute, Stanford University. Before joining the faculty at MSU in 1999 he worked at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) in Hyderabad, India, and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC.

His research interests are in international agricultural development and natural resource management. Focal areas of his research have been on adoption of agricultural technology and natural resource conservation practices, collective action and property rights related to natural resource management, and the interaction of these things with rural poverty in developing countries. He has lived in and conducted research in India, Mexico, and Egypt, and conducted short term research in many other countries as well.

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David D. Kim
Department: Linguistics and Germanic, Slavic, Asian and African Languages
E-mail: ddkim@msu.edu
Web site: http://linglang.msu.edu/people/faculty/david-kim/

ESPP Profile

In addition to being appointed in the Department of Linguistics and Germanic, Slavic, Asian and African Languages, David D. Kim belongs to the Core Faculty of the Global Studies Program in the Arts and Humanities, as well as the Peace and Justice Studies Specialization in the College of Social Science. Professor Kim’s interest in environmental studies has emerged from specializing in colonial writings and postcolonial theories, focusing on literary imagination and nature writing, ecological imagery and environmental film. He is particularly interested in comparative approaches to the environment between the U.S. and Germany.

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Chris A. Klausmeier
Department: Plant Biology
E-mail: klausme1@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/people/faculty/klausmeier/index.php

Our laboratory group seeks to uncover the general principles that organize ecological communities and ecosystems. We focus on phytoplankton and zooplankton, the microscopic plants and animals at the base of lake and ocean food webs. Plankton communities are an ideal focus for this work, because they show striking patterns in space, time, and organization, and are easily manipulated in the lab and field. From a practical point of view, freshwater plankton are important determinants of water quality and marine phytoplankton play major roles in global biogeochemical cycles and perform about half the planet's primary productivity.

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Daniel B. Kramer
Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: dbk@msu.edu
Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~dbk/index.htm

I have a joint appointment between James Madison College and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. My research examines the social, economic and policy aspects of the conservation of biodiversity. Recently, I have researched the role of social capital in the stewardship activities of lake associations. I have also used simulation models to study the effects of variations in fishermen behavior on coral reef ecosystems. Currently I am examining the conservation implications of the connection of a dozen small, isolated communities long the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua. In Michigan, I am studying the processes of residential development near protected areas. Details of my current research are here. My teaching interests include domestic and international environmental policy, sustainable development, globalization and the environment, the social economic, and policy aspects of conservation biology, game theory, and quantitative methods.

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Douglas A. Landis
Department: Entomology
E-mail: landisd@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/landis/tabid/153/Default.aspx

I am interested in the application of ecological theory to problems of importance in entomology and natural resource management. Together with my students, I attempt to understand the influence of landscape structure on insect ecology and management, particularly in regard to biological control of insects and weeds. I hope to use these insights to aid in the design of sustainable landscapes that promote arthropod-mediated ecosystem services such as pollination and pest suppression. I am also interested in the invasive species ecology and management, and in the conservation and restoration of rare species and communities.

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Maria Knight Lapinski
Department: Communication and Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station
E-mail: lapinsk3@msu.edu
Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~lapinsk3/Maria_Lapinski/Welcome.html

Maria Knight Lapinski is joint-appointed as an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. She is currently serving as the Associate Dean for Research for the College of Communication Arts and Sciences. Dr. Lapinski received her doctorate in 2000 from MSU and her Master’s of Arts from University of Hawaii, Manoa.

Her research examines the impact of messages and social-psychological factors on health and environmental risk behaviors with a focus on culturally-based differences and similarities. To this end, Dr. Lapinski has conducted collaborative research projects with her students and colleagues in a number of countries in Asia, the Pacific Rim, Central America, and Africa.

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John J. LaPres
Department: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
E-mail: lapres@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.bch.msu.edu/faculty/lapres.htm

John LaPres’ research is focused on the PAS superfamily of proteins and their role in toxicity. Specifically, he is interested in the signaling of dioxins and PCBs through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and the role cofactors play in this toxic pathway. His secondary interests lie in the role hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) play in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metal induced toxicity and transformation. His laboratory is focusing on characterizing the gene expression profiles of various cell lines and tissues following treatment to environmentally important metals, including nickel, cadmium and chromium. This approach has given us extensive experience in the production, application and analysis of cDNA microarrays. Our toxicogenomic studies will focus on critically evaluating identified genes for their role in metal induced toxicity.

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Grahame J. Larson
Department: Geological Sciences
E-mail: larsong@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~larsong/

My research interests include glacial hydrology and Quaternary geology. With respect to glacial hydrology I am involved in defining the origin and pathway of subglacial discharge associated with temperate glaciers. This generally involves quantifying discharge from the terminus of a glacier and separating flow components using isotopic characteristics of the discharge. My interests in Quaternary geology include sedimentology of glaciogenic deposits that occur along the margin of modern glaciers as well as those left behind by icesheets that once covered the Great Lakes basin. This often includes studying the micromorphology of the deposits. Current projects involve working at the Matanuska Glacier in southern Alaska with a team of researchers from Lehigh University, Penn State University, Augustana College and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research Laboratory. Of particular concern to the team is the origin of basal ice and debris bands that occur near the glacier terminus. Also of interest is defining flow components of meltwater discharge from the glacier and investigating the micromorphologic characteristics of glaciogenic sediments near the glacier margin.

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Jennifer Lau
Department: Kellogg Biological Station and Plant Biology
E-mail: jenlau@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/faculty/lau/

My research bridges community ecology and evolutionary biology to explore how plants interact with both the biotic and abiotic environment and how they respond simultaneously to multiple selective pressures. Much of my work uses environmental perturbations, such as biological invasions and climate change, as tools to study how abiotic and biotic selective agents affect the population biology of native species, species interactions, and the evolution of plant populations. I am particularly interested in studying indirect effects that occur when changes in the biotic or abiotic environment alter interactions between community members.

Recent and current projects include:

  1. Effects of global change on plant evolution.
  2. Native responses to novel community members.
  3. Biotic and abiotic factors interact to limit plant distributions.

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Larry A. Leefers
Department: Forestry
E-mail: leefers@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.for.msu.edu/pages/faculty/leefers_l.html

I conduct research on natural resources valuation--focusing mostly now on hedonic pricing (effects of different natural resource attributes on property values), natural resource accounting, risk analysis (focus on jack pine budworm mostly), and spatial/temporal harvest scheduling based on economics, ecological characteristics and landscape ecology concepts.

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Jay Lennon
Department: Kellogg Biological Station and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
E-mail: lennonja@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/faculty/lennon/

ESPP Profile

Microorganisms are the most abundant and diverse life forms on Earth. They attain high population densities, have fast reproductive rates, and evolve rapidly to changes in their environment. Moreover, microbes carry out important functions, including nutrient cycling, trace gas flux, and carbon sequestration, which are important for the stability of natural and managed ecosystems.

My lab studies the ecology and evolution of microbial communities. We are interested in the biotic and abiotic factors that generate and maintain microbial biodiversity. In turn, we seek to understand the implications of microbial diversity for ecosystem functioning. We conduct research in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and use a variety of tools including molecular biology, simulation modeling, laboratory experiments, field surveys, and whole ecosystem manipulations in natural and managed ecosystems.

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Richard Lenski
Department: Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Zoology, and Crop and Soil Sciences
E-mail: lenski@msu.edu
Web site: http://myxo.css.msu.edu/index.html

The main focus of research in my lab is on experimental evolution. Evolution is usually investigated using the comparative method or by studying fossils. Our approach is to watch evolution, as it happens, during experiments that are replicated and performed under defined conditions. Studying "evolution in action" requires either a time machine (which we don't have) or else organisms that replicate, mutate, and evolve quickly, so that we can observe phenotypic and genetic changes across many generations. In our research, we perform experiments with two different fast-evolving systems: bacteria (especially E. coli) and "digital organisms" (self-replicating computer programs).

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Shu-Guang Li
Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
E-mail: lishug@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~lishug/

Dr. Li and his research team are investigating better ways to analyze and model flow and contaminant transport in complex groundwater systems. Dr. Li is particularly interested in the effects of heterogeneity, scale interactions, uncertainty propagation, interactions with surface water, and integrated tools that can adapt to complex field conditions across multiple spatial and temporal scales.

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Hui Li
Department: Crop and Soil Sciences
E-mail: lihui@msu.edu
Web site: http://cit.msu.edu/faculty/Li.html

Dr. Li's research is in the area of environmental fate and transport of organic contaminants especially for those containing complex chemical structures. Specifically, he is interested in:

  • Environmental occurrence and fate of emerging contaminants
  • Interaction of pharmaceuticals/organic contaminants/pesticides with soils and soil components
  • Plant uptake of organic contaminants
  • Environmental remediation technology
  • Soil fertility and nutrient cycling

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Julie Libarkin
Department: Geological Sciences, Division of Science and Mathematics Education
E-mail: libarkin@msu.edu
Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~libarkin

I am an Associate Professor at Michigan State University with a joint appointment in the Department of Geological Sciences and the Division of Science and Mathematics Education (DSME). In addition to ESPP, I am also affiliated with the Center for Research on College Science Teaching and Learning (CRCSTL) & MSU's Cognitive Science Program. My work focuses primarily on geocognition, the way in which people perceive and understand the Earth. I am particularly interested in building interdisciplinary research partnerships to investigate issues of importance to climate and environmental science.

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Arika Ligmann-Zielinska
Department: Geography
E-mail: ligmannz@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~ligmannz

ESPP Profile

My research interests encompass a broad range of modeling approaches that capture the dynamic relationship between human decision making and land use change. The philosophical approach to modeling that I employ is rather unorthodox and focuses on exploring generative 'computational laboratories' rather than predicting future growth scenarios based on fine-tuned elaborate models. My research has focused on GIS-coupled modeling for spatial decision support systems and in particular:

  1. Generating land use alternatives with multiobjective land use allocation
  2. Exploring land use alternatives with spatial agent-based simulation
  3. Modeling choices - designing algorithms for spatial option exploration, spatial choice, and sensitivity analysis of spatial decision making.
Other themes of interest include spatial analysis, environmental geography and sustainability, and water resource use.

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Elena G. Litchman
Department: Zoology
E-mail: litchman@kbs.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/faculty/litchman/

Research interests include aquatic ecology; community ecology; phytoplankton ecology, physiology and evolution; global change and harmful algal blooms. I am interested in how the interplay of biotic and abiotic factors structures phytoplankton communities in both freshwater and marine environments. Currently our lab focuses on the following questions:

  • effects of temporal and spatial heterogeneity on phytoplankton communities
  • ecological traits, trade-offs and community structure
  • broad patterns in plankton diversity and trait distributions
  • global change and harmful algal blooms
  • invasive microbes
  • nitrogen-fixers in phytoplankton communities
  • Lake Baikal (planktonic food web structure)

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Jianguo (Jack) Liu
Department: Center for Systems Integration & Sustainability
E-mail: jliu@panda.msu.edu
Web site: http://csis.msu.edu/people/jianguo-liu

Jianguo (Jack) Liu is a human-environment scientist and sustainability scholar. He is the Rachel Carson Chair in Sustainability and University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Dr. Liu is particularly keen to connect seemingly unconnected issues (e.g., divorce and environmental sustainability). His broad research interests include household-environment interactions, complexity of coupled human and natural systems (CHANS), sustainability science, China’s environment, and globalization. He takes a holistic approach to addressing complex human-environmental challenges through systems integration (i.e., integrating multiple disciplines such as ecology and social sciences). Dr. Liu’s projects include studying the complex interactions among people, panda habitat, and policies in China; and the International Network of Research on Coupled Human and Natural Systems (CHANS-Net).

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David T. Long
Department: Geological Sciences
E-mail: long@msu.edu
Web site: http://geology.msu.edu/people/long.html

Research interests are:

  • Finding solutions to environmental and ecosystem health issues.
  • Geochemical, isotopic, and microbiological controls on the evolution of water.
  • Understanding biogeochemical cycles at watershed and regional scales using sediment chronologies.

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Maria Claudia Lopez
Department: Department of Community Stability
E-mail: mlopez@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.csus.msu.edu/people/faculty/mlopez/index.html

Maria Claudia Lopez is an assistant professor in the Department of Community Sustainability. Her research uses multiple methods, including field experiments from behavioral economics, institutional analysis, econometrics, ethnography, and participatory research, to understand how rural communities can collaborate successfully in the management of commonly held natural resources. She has done research in Colombia, Spain, Peru, Costa Rica, USA, Bolivia and Uganda. Before coming to MSU she was a Research Associate in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. While there, she worked with an interdisciplinary group of researchers (ecologist, psychologists, economists and political scientists) developing a project aiming to understand how knowledge about how human decision making affects and is affected by changing forest conditions. Before that, Maria Claudia was an assistant professor in her home country, Colombia. While in Colombia, she taught various classes at the undergrad and grad level. She also supervised several thesis (undergrad and grad level) in natural resource management, tourism, conservation and collective action. Maria Claudia is an economist specializing in natural resources managment, environmental economics, experimental economics and collective action with a master's in rural development from the Universidad Javeriana in Colombia, and a PhD in Resource Economics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She also completed a two year postdoctoral fellowship working with Elinor Ostrom at the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University on issues of governance, common property, and institutional analysis.

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Scott T. Loveridge
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
E-mail: loverid2@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/loveridge_s

Scott Loveridge’s interests span community, environment, economic development, and agriculture. His Extension/Outreach programs focus on local and regional development policy. He teaches graduate-level regional economics, and also has fifteen years' experience developing and delivering curricula for adult learners. He is a consistent early adopter of Internet technologies to deliver educational programs. He is founding editor of the Web Book of Regional Science (a site dedicated to analytical techniques and policies for regional development that garners over 10M hits annually). His professional interests include economic development policy, land use, community systems, and regional economics. He is director of the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development.

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William A. Lovis
Department: Anthropology
E-mail: lovis@msu.edu
Web site: http://anthropology.msu.edu/blog/people/lovis/

My research involves the coupling between human and natural systems. In particular, I undertake work on responses of past human systems to Holocene paleoenvironmental changes in the Great Lakes and in England/Western Europe from 10000 BP to the onset of industrialization. I have been collaborating in multidisciplinary frameworks designed to assess the relationship between hunter/gatherer and early horticultural systems and changes in climate, vegetation, and landscape. These collaborations involve anthropology, geology, geography, and botany. I am currently engaged in macroscale synthetic work in both the Saginaw Valley of Michigan and northern Yorkshire.

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Lifeng Luo
Department: Geography
E-mail: lluo@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~lluo

ESPP Profile

I am an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at Michigan State University. I joined the faculty in August 2009.

My research interests are primarily in the field of hydroclimatology, a multidisciplinary field with strong links to hydrology, climate science, water resources, and even ecology. More specifically, I am interested in understanding how the land and atmosphere interact through hydrologic processes and how this interaction affects the variability and predictability of the climate system at different spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the processes that govern land-atmosphere interactions, developing the ability to predict the variation in the hydrological processes, and determining their usefulness for resource management are the fundamental science priorities of my research.

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Frank Lupi
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
E-mail: lupi@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~lupi

Frank has a joint appointment in the Agricultural Economics and Fisheries and Wildlife Departments. He is a member of the Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management. His recent research focuses on modeling Michigan fish and wildlife resource demand and value. Current projects address resource management issues in Michigan and the Great Lakes including the valuation of wetland services; benefit-cost analysis of hydropower streamflow mandates; potential damages of aquatic nuisance species; and public preferences for deer populations.

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David P. Lusch
Department: Geography
E-mail: lusch@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/lusch.html

  • Applications of remote sensing and/or geographic information systems to problem-solving in agriculture, natural resources, and human health
  • Meso-scale hydrogeology for aquifer vulnerability assessments and community ground-water protection planning
  • Mapping Land Use/Land Cover and its change
  • Spatial analysis of landform/soil/vegetation relationships
  • Glacial geomorphology of Michigan
  • Ecoregion mapping and management especially the nexus of landscape ecology, cultural ecology, and political ecology

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Carolyn M. Malmstrom
Department: Plant Biology
E-mail: carolynm@msu.edu
Web site: http://plantbiology.msu.edu/faculty/faculty-research/carolyn-malmstrom/

My lab studies ecosystem and landscape dynamics. We are particularly interested in understanding how ecosystems respond to perturbations, such as changes in disturbance regimes or the introduction of exotic species. We use the best technology from a range of disciplines to solve problems and advance our work. Current projects incorporate molecular approaches with field work and spatial tools such as GPS, GIS, and remote sensing. We work closely with land managers and conservation agencies when designing our projects to ensure that our work not only makes important contributions to basic science questions but also advances understanding in areas of significant interest to society as a whole.

Several current emphases are:

  • Understanding the influence of plant viruses on natural communities. Plant viruses are potent ecological agents that have been long overlooked.
  • Understanding the influence of managed disturbances (prescribed fire, rotational grazing) and native grass restoration on grassland productivity and the control of noxious rangeland weeds.

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Shannon D. Manning
Department: Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
E-mail: Shannon.Manning@ht.msu.edu

ESPP Profile

Shannon Manning, Ph.D., M.P.H., a molecular biologist and epidemiologist, is an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University (MSU). She is mainly interested in the application of Research Fellow in the Emerging Infectious Diseases program funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Association of Public Health Laboratories. Through molecular biology, population genetic, and phylogenetic methods to answer questions about the pathogenesis, emergence, virulence, evolution, and transmission of food- and water-borne pathogens, such as Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). After earning a M.P.H. and Ph.D. in molecular epidemiology in 1998 and 2001 from the University of Michigan, she worked as a this fellowship, she was placed at the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH), Bureau of Laboratories for two years working on the characterization of STEC isolates from patients in Michigan. Dr. Manning came to MSU in 2004 as a Research Assistant Professor working jointly with Dr. Thomas Whittam and Dr. H. Dele Davies. She joined the faculty in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Michigan State University (MSU) in October 2010.

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Phanikumar S. Mantha
Department: Civil & Environmental Engineering
E-mail: phani@egr.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~phani

Research interests in our group generally involve water quality and quantity issues. Recent research addressed questions involving the fate and transport of chemical and biological agents in different hydrologic units in the Great Lakes region (watersheds, rivers and streams, lakes and groundwater). A common unifying thread in all our activities is the development and application of coupled (physical-chemical-biological) models and integration of laboratory and field-scale observations with modeling. Often the goal is to learn about key processes and parameters and how they change across scales or with time.

Projects include:

  • Near-shore Hydrodynamics and Transport in Lake Michigan
  • 3D Reactive Transport Modeling of Carbon Tetrachloride Biodegradation at the Schoolcraft, MI Site
  • Experimental and Numerical Studies of Non-Darcy Flow and Transport in Porous Media
  • Modeling Hydrodynamics and Transport in the Red Cedar River, MSU

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Sandra Marquart-Pyatt
Department: Sociology and Environmental Science and Policy Program
E-mail: s.marquartpyatt@usu.edu
Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/faculty/profile/marquart-pyatt-sandra/

ESPP Profile

Sandy Marquart-Pyatt is an Assistant Professor in Sociology and the Environmental Science and Policy Program. She joined the department in the fall of 2009. She received her Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 2004. Her research and teaching areas of expertise are in comparative social change, environmental sociology, political sociology, and quantitative methods. Her current work focuses on identifying cross-national patterns on an array of environmental attitudes, beliefs, behavioral intentions, and behaviors. She is also exploring the determinants of political attitudes and participation comparatively and cross-nationally. She is also engaged in projects examining democratic attitudes in Poland and attitudes related to welfare state institutions across nations.

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Andrew J. Mason
Department: Electrical and Chemical Engineering
E-mail: mason@msu.edu
Web site: www.egr.msu.edu/~mason

Dr. Mason directs the Advanced MicroSystems and Circuits (AMSaC) laboratory with a mission is to develop intelligent tools for personal health and safety by exploring innovative mixed-signal circuits, microfabricated structures, and real time data analysis algorithms that bridge the gap between emerging nano/micro sensor technologies and high societal impact applications. The miniaturized sensory systems currently being developed in the AMSaC lab include wearable gas analysis systems for acute monitoring of air toxins, chemical sensor arrays for underground mine safety, and high throughput biochemical sensor arrays utilizing unique characteristics of membrane proteins. High performance electrochemical sensor arrays, low-power wearable instrumentation, energy efficient data synthesis, and energy harvesting are critical area of studies in all current projects. In addition, Dr. Mason has a keen interest to develop new collaborations for exploring technologies and smart microsystems that promote and enable sustainable living and zero-carbon footprint lifestyles.

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Susan J. Masten
Department: Civil & Environmental Engineering
E-mail: masten@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/cee/people/masten.html

Professor Masten’s research involves the use of chemical oxidants for the remediation of soils, water, and leachates contaminated with hazardous organic chemicals. Her research is presently focused on the in-situ use of gaseous ozone to oxidize residual contaminants in saturated soils using ozone sparging and in unsaturated soils using soil venting. Dr. Masten is also very interested in evaluating the toxicity of the by-products of chemical oxidation processes. Work has focused on the ozonation and chlorination of several pesticides and on the PAHs. Professor Masten is also involved in a project to use ozone in combination with fixed film biological treatment for the control of disinfection-byproducts formed from the ozonation of waters containing humic substances. She is also working in the area of the control of odors from livestock wastes and in the inactivation of Cryptos poridium parvum in drinking waters.

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William McConnell
Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: mcconn64@msu.edu
Web site: http://csis.msu.edu/people/bill-mcconnell

McConnell is associate director of the MSU Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability. He came to MSU from Indiana University, where he helped coordinate a network of global-change scientists focusing on land use and land-cover change. This broad perspective on global issues is balanced by his research and engagement on sustainability at the local level in the United States and in the developing world, particularly Africa.

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Aaron M. McCright
Department: Sociology
E-mail: mccright@msu.edu
Web site: http://lymanbriggs.msu.edu/faculty/bios/user.cfm?UserID=25

Aaron M. McCright (Ph.D., Washington State University) holds a joint academic appointment in Lyman Briggs College and the Department of Sociology. Most of his research spans the fields of environmental sociology, political sociology/social movements, and sociology of science and technology. His intellectual agenda is to enhance our sociological understanding of how political, social, and scientific dynamics influence society's capacity for recognizing and dealing with environmental degradation and technological risks. This has led him to investigate (a) the political dynamics and public understanding of climate change; (b) social movement identity and ideology for the environmental movement and beyond; (c) our sociological understanding of societal risk; (d) the influence of globalization forces on environmental management in formerly remote communities; and (e) the dynamics of scientific practices at tropical field stations. Dr. McCright is most well known for his work to sociologically explain the political dynamics and public understanding of climate science and policy in the United States.

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Deborah G. McCullough
Department: Entomology
E-mail: mccullo6@msue.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/mccullough/tabid/156/Default.aspx

Dr. McCullough has an active research, extension and teaching program in forest entomology. She works closely with state and federal agencies, foresters, Christmas tree growers and property owners on issues related to forest insects and forest health. Dr. McCullough's research addresses the impacts and contributing factors associated with damaging forest insect populations and the development of long-term management strategies to conserve or enhance forest health. Research interests include invasive forest insect ecology, impacts and management; dynamics of forest insect populations; silvicultural and biological control of forest insect pests; and effects of disturbance on forest insect communities.

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Edmund F. McGarrell
Department: Criminal Justice
E-mail: mcgarrell@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.cj.msu.edu/people/

Edmund F. McGarrell is Director and Professor of the School of Criminal Justice at MSU. McGarrell also co-chairs MSU's multi-disciplinary research initiative on Risk, Values, and Decisions. His research interests are in the area of communities and crime....Through his roles as academic liaison to the Environmental Crimes Committee of the EPA-International Association of Chiefs of Police as well as with MSU's Risk Initiative, he is working to build a research and education program in Conservation Criminology. Specifically, he is collaborating with faculty in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, School of Criminal Justice, and the Environmental Science and Policy Program to examine the nature and scope of environmental crime and the systems of compliance and enforcement in natural resource protection and management. This includes building data systems related to environmental crime and human-made threats to natural resources, community policing models applied to resource protection, and international illicit markets and the associated threats to natural resources. An initial project done in collaboration with Interpol's Pollution Crimes Committee involves a study of the international trade in electronic waste.

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Laurie K. Medina
Department: Anthropology
E-mail: medina@msu.edu
Web site: http://anthropology.msu.edu/blog/people/medina/

Laurie Medina pursues research that integrates issues in economic development, environmentalism, collective identity formation, and social movements. Her research on agricultural development in Belize links the construction and mobilization of collective identities to negotiations over development priorities and agendas. Her work on ecotourism in Belize focuses on efforts to combine economic development with conservation goals.

With funding from the MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Medina’s current project explores the complex negotiations involved in implementing ecotourism in several Mopan Maya villages in the tropical forests of southern Belize. The creation of protected areas in southern Belize and the promotion of tourism to those protected areas have incorporated residents of nearby villages into debates over environmentalist and development agendas that are simultaneously local and global in scope. Maya villagers negotiate with government officials, international development donors, tourists, national and international environmentalist NGOs, and transnational indigenous rights organizations over a range of questions: What are the goals of development and conservation, and how might they be achieved? What rights and resources should local communities enjoy? How should village residents be integrated into ecotourism? What kinds of power are exercised by the diverse stakeholders involved in ecotourism, and how does power structure their participation in planning and policy making? The project also explores negotiations among village residents themselves, over issues such as the gendered impact of ecotourism, the ways that inequalities among villagers enable or limit participation in ecotourism, and representations of Maya culture in tourism. Since contests over the concepts of ‘environment’ and ‘development’ in southern Belize are linked to Maya struggles for land and autonomy, the research also explores Maya communities’ efforts to mobilize alliances with pan-Indian and environmentalist NGOs to pursue claims to land.

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Haddish Melakeberhan
Department: Horticulture
E-mail: melakebe@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.hrt.msu.edu/haddish-melakeberhan

I am an Agricultural Nematologist with major research emphasis on i) understanding soil-nutrient-nematode interactions, ii) nematode adaptation and parasitic (genetic) variability, and iii) assessing agroecological feasibility, efficiency, and sustainability of management strategies. My program’s strategic vision has been to develop integrated knowledge towards adjusting soils in agro-biologically and environmentally sustainable ways so that all nematodes (herbivores and beneficial) can be managed as part of a soil ecosystem.

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Richard W. Merritt
Department: Entomology
E-mail: merrittr@msu.edu
Web site: https://www.msu.edu/user/merrittr/

Dr. Merritt's major research interests focus on the feeding ecology, animal microbial interactions, population dynamics, and influence of environmental factors on immature aquatic insects, especially the Diptera. His most recent research has concentrated on the ecology of an emerging disease, Buruli Ulcer, in Africa which involves insects, biomonitoring of streams and rivers, the effects of pollutants on aquatic ecosystems, and the role of marine-derived nutrients (salmon carcasses) on aquatic insect communities in Alaskan streams. He also is involved in the field of Forensic Entomology, and assists police departments in crime scene investigations involving insects. He has co-edited three editions of a textbook entitled, "An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America", and, a book entitled, "Black Flies: Ecology, Population Management, and Annotated World List." Dr. Merritt received the MSU Distinguished Faculty Award in 2004 and the North American Benthological Society's Award of Excellence in Research in 2007.

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Joseph (Joe) P. Messina
Department: Geography, Center for Global Change and Earth Observations
E-mail: jpm@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/messina.html

My research program focuses broadly upon Land Use and Land Cover Change (LULCC) and the techniques and theoretical methods that allow one to explore the spatio-temporal dynamics of change, including, Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing, Complexity Theory, and Dynamic Spatial Simulation Models. I am currently working on projects in Ecuador, Thailand, and the Florida Bay. I have published on diverse topics and regions including: land use theory, remote sensing techniques, the drug war in Colombia, land cover changes in East Africa, spatial statistics in the the Rocky Mountains, and health care access in Michigan, among many others. Funding sources include the NASA, NSF, DOD, and Michigan Department of Community Health.

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Jessica R. Miesel
Department: Department of Forestry
E-mail: mieselje@msu.edu

Dr. Miesel is an Assistant Professor of Applied Forest Ecology and Management. Her dissertation research evaluated the effects of prescribed fire and forest thinning restoration treatments on soil properties and conifer foliage in a western mixed-conifer forest. She completed postdoctoral research in grassland ecology and bioenergy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and in fire ecology with the Lake States Fire Science Consortium. She is broadly interested in fire ecology and management in temperate ecosystems. Her specific interests include fire effects on coniferous forest soils, fire and fire surrogate forest management strategies, and the role of natural and anthropogenic black carbon in soil ecosystem processes. She is also interested in the role of ecology in society, including intersections between ecology and environmental justice, and the skills ecologists need for effective interdisciplinary collaboration and community engagement.

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Kelly F. Millenbah
Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: millenba@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~millenba

Kelly F. Millenbah is Associate Dean of Lyman Briggs College and Associate Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, where she served as Director of Academic Programs from 2007-2010 and has been active in the STEPPS (Science, Technology, the Environment, and Public Policy) specialization, which is jointly organized by LBC, James Madison College and Fisheries and Wildlife. From 2004-2007, she was the Associate Director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program. Her research program focuses on the conservation and management of disturbed and damaged ecosystems with implications toward unexploited and protected species (i.e., threatened and endangered species), more broadly termed restoration ecology. She has established herself as a scholar on teaching and learning, in part as an outgrowth of her participation in the Lilly Teaching Fellows program. Millenbah has worked to involve students in international experience. She has led study abroad courses to Kenya, Australia and South Africa.

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Jade Mitchell
Department: Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering
E-mail: jade@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/people/profile/jade

Education: Ph.D. Environmental Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 2010 Dissertation: “Using Analytic Models for Risk-Based Responses to Pathogenic Agents in the Environment” M.S. Civil Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 2007 Thesis: “Performance of Polypropylene: Geosynthetic Filters Under Pressurized Hydraulic Flow Conditions: Headloss and Iron Oxide Coati B.S. Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1997 Certificate in Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Research Interests: Risk assessment: chemical and microbial stressors from diverse environmental exposures including bioterrorism and food safety Quantitative analysis: decision analysis , Bayesian statistics, and systems analysis Modeling: Dose-response and exposure modeling including both exogenous and endogenous fate Risk management and environmental policy: benefit-cost analysis, risk perception and communication

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Georgina Montgomery
Department: History and Lyman Briggs College
E-mail: montg165@msu.edu
Web site: http://lymanbriggs.msu.edu/faculty/bios/user.cfm?UserID=72

ESPP Profile

Georgina Montgomery received her PhD in the History of Science and Technology from the University of Minnesota in 2005. After teaching for two years at Montana State University, Dr. Montgomery joined Lyman Briggs College (75% appointment) and History (25% appointment) in the fall of 2008. Her research focuses on the history of field science, particularly the development of field methods and sites within primatology and animal behavior studies. Primatology is a transnational science and thus her research also analyzes issues concerning race, gender and globalization. She is an award-winning educator with teaching awards from the University of Minnesota and the Humane Society of the United States. She has taught LBC 332: Technology and Culture and LBC 133: Introduction to the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science. Dr. Montgomery also teaches Hist 110: Animal Histories in the Department of History. Her courses explore fundamental and often controversial topics in science and society and integrate experiential learning whenever possible. For example, her animal histories course includes field trips to animal-related places on and off campus.

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Nathan Moore
Department: Geography
E-mail: moorena@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/moore.html

ESPP Profile

Current research:

  • China. With colleagues at Zhejiang University (ZJU) I am working to combine remote sensing, climate modeling, hydrology, and crop modeling to develop estimates of crop yield, water quality, and land cover/land use change (LCLUC). In addition, with colleagues at MSU, I am researching impacts of land use change in urban environments on climate in China.
  • East Africa. I am modeling and projecting climate trends and variability in Eastern Africa as part of the Climate-Land Interactions Project (CLIP) at Michigan State University. I am employing a variety of GIS tools and remote sensing data to compare model results with observed temperature, rainfall, and other variables.
  • The Amazon. I am exploring the range of uncertainty in Amazonian land-climate interactions by explicitly simulating 50 different "worst case scenario" landscapes and 50 "best case scenario" landscapes.
  • Experimental Design. I am also interested in experimental design and how choices in the structure of an experiment can influence the range of possible outcomes.

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Noga Morag-Levine
Department: College of Law
E-mail: moraglev@law.msu.edu
Web site: http://www.law.msu.edu/faculty_staff/profile.php?prof=372

Noga Morag-Levine studies regulatory politics with an eye to the role of legal traditions and cross-national influences in shaping policy instruments. She is the author of Chasing the Wind: Regulating Air Pollution in the Common Law State (Princeton University Press, 2003). Her current work focuses on the place of common law ideology—defined in opposition to continental administrative paradigms—in Anglo-American regulatory history and policy. Her recent writings explore this issue within a broad legal-historical framework and with reference to specific controversies, including emissions trading, the status of the precautionary principle in regulatory regimes, and Supreme Court citations to foreign precedents.

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Emilio Federico Moran
Department: Geography
E-mail: moranef@msu.edu
Web site: http://geo.msu.edu/people/moran-emilo/

Emilio F. Moran joined MSU in January 2013 as Visiting Hannah Professor at Michigan State University, associated with the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, the Center for System Integration and Sustainability, and the Department of Geography. He was until 2012 Distinguished Professor and the James H. Rudy Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University,Professor of Environmental Sciences, Adjunct Professor of Geography, and Director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (ACT) at Indiana University. Dr. Moran is the author of ten books, fifteen edited volumes and more than 160 journal articles and book chapters. His research has been supported by NSF, NIH, NOAA and NASA for the past two decades. His three latest books, Environmental Social Science (Wiley/Blackwell 2010), People and Nature (Blackwell 2006) and Human Adaptability, 3rd edition (Westview 2007) address broader issues of human interaction with the environment under conditions of change. His most recent book, Meio Ambiente & Florestas (Editora SENAC Sao Paulo 2010) addresses the value of forests in Brazil and the world. His book Developing the Amazon (Indiana U Press, 1981) was the first book-length study of the human and environmental impacts of the Transamazon Highway. He is a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London, Fellow of the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropology, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2010.

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Cheryl Murphy
Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: camurphy@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/people/faculty.php

ESPP Profile

The main question that motivates my work is how information translates across different scales. Using fish as a model organism, I strive to synthesize information collected on individuals and use this information to answer questions at a higher level of organization such as, how do changes in the physiological processes occurring within an individual translate to behavioral changes and ecologically relevant endpoints, how do short term phenotypic changes in life history traits alter long term genetic change, and how do anthropogenic influences such as contaminants impact such relationships and affect populations or communities of fish?

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Amirpouyan Nejadhashemi
Department: Biosystems; Crop and Soil Sciences
E-mail: pouyan@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/age/pouyan.html

ESPP Profile

Dr. Nejadhashemi received his doctorate degree from the University of Maryland. He is currently working as an Assistant Professor of Water Resources Engineering at MSU. His research interests are focused on the description, analysis and prevention of non-point source pollution at laboratory, field, watershed and regional scales. Specific interests are in watershed/water quality modeling and analysis, surface water-groundwater interactions, artificial intelligence (AI), geographic information system (GIS), decision support tools, and object-oriented programming.

His current projects include:

  • Developing Decision Support System for Analyzing Sedimentation Reduction Strategies for Tuttle Creek Lake
  • Developing Nutrient, Sediment, Flow and Temperature Estimates for Fish Community Condition Prediction Across the Agricultural Regions of Michigan and Wisconsin
  • Water Quantity and Water Quality Effects of BMPs Implementation in Urban Areas

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Michael P. Nelson
Department: Lyman Briggs School and Fisheries & Wildlife
E-mail: mpnelson@msu.edu
Web site: http://lymanbriggs.msu.edu/faculty/bios/user.cfm?UserID=26

Michael P. Nelson holds a joint appointment as an associate professor of environmental ethics and philosophy in the Lyman Briggs College, the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and the Department of Philosophy. In addition to many essays and articles, he is the co-author or co-editor of four books in and around the area of environmental philosophy: The Great New Wilderness Debate (1998), The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate (2008), and American Indian Environmental Ethics: An Ojibwa Case Study (2004), all with J. Baird Callicott, and For All Time: Our Obligation to the Future, forthcoming with Kathleen Dean Moore. Nelson is also environmental philosopher of the Isle Royale Wolf-Moose Project -- the longest continuous study of a predator-prey relationship in the world -- and spends part of each summer working with the animal ecologists on the island. He is currently at work on a book focused on the history and philosophical implications of the project. He is the co-creator and co-director of the Conservation Ethics Group, an environmental ethics and problem solving consultancy group. Nelson's research and teaching focus is environmental ethics and philosophy: from the concept of wilderness to topics in the philosophy of ecology, from hunting ethics to theories of environmental education, from topics in wildlife ecology and conservation biology to questions about science and advocacy. Nelson holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Lancaster University, England.

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Sarah Nicholls
Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resources Studies and Geography
E-mail: nicho210@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.carrs.msu.edu/faculty/viewPage.php?netID=nicho210

Sarah Nicholls is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment between the Departments of Community, Agriculture, Recreation & Resource Studies (CARRS, 75%) and Geography (25%). She received her B.Sc. (Hons) in Geography from University College London, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences from Texas A&M University.

Sarah's interests focus on two main areas:

  • International tourism, planning and development, with a special emphasis on tourism on islands and in small nation states
  • Urban park issues, including the accessibility and equity of urban park distributions, and the impacts of green spaces on surrounding property values.

More specific interests and areas of expertise include interactions between tourism and climate change; agri-tourism; and applications of GPS and GIS in parks, recreation, and tourism.

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Patricia E. Norris
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics and Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies
E-mail: norrisp@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/norris

Pat Norris is the Guyers-Seevers Chair in Natural Resource Conservation at Michigan State University. She has conducted research and developed outreach programs addressing issues in soil conservation, water quality, groundwater management, wetland policy, land markets, land use conflicts and farmland preservation. In her extension work, she has focused largely upon natural resource policy issues, working with private resource owners, local governments, and state and federal agencies as they address the needs for and impacts of institutional change. In addition, her teaching responsibilities have included courses in natural resource economics, environmental economics, ecological economics, environmental science, and agricultural policy.

Professional Interests:

  • Economics of natural resource conservation
  • Incentive-based natural resource conservation and environmental policy
  • Conservation education

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William J. Northcott
Department: Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering
E-mail: northco2@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/age/northcott.html

William Northcott's interests include watershed hydrology, agricultural drainage, non-point source pollution, and Geographic Information Systems. Current projects include (a) Determining the Impact of Geology; Climate and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Irrigation for Corn Product; (b) Restoring Great Lakes Basin Waters Through the Use of Conservation Credits and a Water Balance Analysis; and (c) Evaluation of an Innovative Filter Mound Technology for Treatment and Disposal of Dairy Milkhouse Wastewater.

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Michael O'Rourke
Department: Department of Philosophy
E-mail: orourk51@msu.edu
Web site: http://www.igert.org/profiles/3436

Michael O'Rourke is Professor of Philosophy and faculty in AgBioResearch at Michigan State University. His research interests include environmental philosophy, the nature of epistemic integration and communication in collaborative, cross-disciplinary research, and the nature of linguistic communication between intelligent agents. He is Director of the Toolbox Project, an NSF-sponsored research initiative that investigates philosophical approaches to facilitating interdisciplinary research. He has published extensively on the topics of communication, interdisciplinary theory and practice, and robotic agent design. He has been a co-principal investigator or collaborator on funded projects involving environmental science education, facilitating cross-disciplinary communication, biodiversity conservation, sustainable agriculture, resilience in environmental systems, and autonomous underwater vehicles. He co-founded and served as co-director of the Inland Northwest Philosophy Conference, an interdisciplinary conference on philosophical themes, and as co-editor of the Topics in Contemporary Philosophy series published by MIT Press.

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    Jennifer M. Olson
    Department: Telecommunications, Information Studies & the Media
    E-mail: olsonjj@msu.edu
    Web site: http://tc.msu.edu/users/jennifer-olson

    Jennifer Olson is interested in the interaction between changes in the environment and society. Understanding the causes of environmental trends and how they affect society leads to important policy implications from the national to the international level, and she regularly works with policy makers, United Nations officials and others to develop effective methods of communicating science results. Research topics that she has focused on include the socioeconomic causes of land degradation, the effects of environmental change on human health, the interaction between land use and climate change, and the impacts of land use change on biodiversity. Jennifer has over fifteen years of living and working experience in Africa. She is the currently the leader of the land use change component and manager of a NSF project, "An Integrated Analysis of Regional Land-Climate Interactions in East Africa", and will play a similar leadership role in a new NSF project, "Dynamic Interactions among People, Livestock, and Savanna Ecosystems under Climate Change." In addition, she leads a team of medical, natural and social scientists in a health-environment initiative, "Impacts of climate and land use change on emerging human and livestock diseases in East Africa."

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    Nathaniel E. Ostrom
    Department: Zoology
    E-mail: ostromn@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.zoology.msu.edu/all-faculty/nathaniel-e-ostrom.html

    Nathaniel E. Ostrom is a professor in Zoology and co-director of the Biogeochemistry Environmental Research Initiative. His research focuses on the application of stable isotopes and other approaches for understanding the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen in a variety of ecosystems. Current research projects include:

    • Understanding novel nitrogen cycling pathways in Lake Vida, Antarctica
    • The impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico
    • Application of the isotopomers of nitrous oxide to evaluate the origins of this greenhouse gas
    • Instrument development to enable real time and in situ stable isotope measurements

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    Peggy H. Ostrom
    Department: Zoology
    E-mail: ostrom@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.zoology.msu.edu/all-faculty/peggy-h-ostrom.html

    My primary research interests are in the fields of biogeochemistry and organic geochemistry. Recent research has focused on the application of stable isotopes to a wide variety of ecosystem problems including the understanding the influence of marine derived nutrients during salmon migrations on terrestrial ecosystems and in the evaluation of the microbial origins of nitrous oxide in terrestrial landscapes. My research also focuses on evaluating the origin of organic matter in fossil bones that involves the sequencing of amino acid in the bone protein osteocalcinin. This information can be used to understand evolutionary relationships in ancient organisms over a time frame that exceeds DNA preservation.

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    Amber L. Pearson
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: apearson@msu.edu

    Amber L. Pearson is a health/medical geographer who will join the Geography Department in 2014 in association with MSU’s Water Initiative. Dr. Pearson obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2010 where she worked with noted medical geographer Dr. Jonathan Mayer. Her Ph.D. Dissertation focused on land-use policies in Uganda, specifically the accessibility of permanent drinking water to nomadic pastoralists in the area of Lake Mburo. Dr. Pearson currently resides in Wellington, New Zealand where she is a Research Fellow at the Burden of Disease Epidemiology, Equity and Cost-Effectiveness Programme at the University of Otago. Prior to this role, she was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, where she led research that focused on the resilience of populations in areas where environmental and social conditions were favorable for the spread of disease. Dr. Pearson is currently working on three areas that are central to MSU’s Water Initiative, including 1) Rotavirus (a water-borne disease) outbreaks in Auckland, New Zealand, 2) Accessibility of public drinking water child health in Wellington, New Zealand, and 3) the visibility of blue spaces associated with water to mental health. Once she arrives at MSU, Dr. Pearson plans to rejuvenate her work related to the availability of drinking water in Uganda. Dr. Pearson has published five peer-reviewed papers thus far, with an additional four in press.

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    Donald Penner
    Department: Crop & Soil Sciences
    E-mail: pennerd@msu.edu
    Web site: http://css.msu.edu/People.cfm

    Donald Penner is recognized internationally as a leader in the field of weed and herbicide physiology. He is a preeminent researcher and mentor of graduate students in weed science. Penner joined the faculty of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences in 1967. He has taught a graduate course on herbicide action and metabolism since 1969 and has chaired the departmental graduate programs committee for three separate terms. He has been active in curriculum development and has served as a major professor for over 30 graduate students. His research activities include weed physiology, herbicide action and fate, herbicide resistance in crops and weeds, and foliar absorption of herbicides. He has published more than 200 papers in scientific journals, co-authored a book, and written numerous book chapters. Penner was presented the Weed Science Society of America Outstanding Research Award in 1987, the Fellow Award in 1993, and the Outstanding Teaching Award in 1997. In 1994, he was awarded the Senior Faculty Meritorious Research Award by the MSU Chapter of Sigma Xi. Penner became a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1996.

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    Harry Perlstadt
    Department: Sociology
    E-mail: perlstad@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~perlstad/

    Harry Perlstadt, Ph.D. (University of Chicago, sociology), M.P.H. (University of Michigan, health planning & administration), has more than 25 years experience in evaluation of health and community programs. He is currently working on a project to improve screening for high blood lead levels funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and on an evaluation of national environmental health action plans in Europe for World Health Organization (WHO). He has published on the topic of citizen participation in health planning. He is active in the American Public Health Association, currently serving as chair of its Science Board and co-chair of its Joint Policy Committee.

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    Thomas J. Pinnavaia
    Department: Chemistry
    E-mail: pinnavai@cem.msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.cem.msu.edu/~pinnweb/

    The remediation of industrial waste streams and contaminated aquifers often is limited by the performance properties of available materials for adsorbing or converting the contaminant components. Mixtures of contaminants, especially mixtures of organic and inorganic pollutants, are particularly problematic, because different chemistries are generally required to address each component. Our current NIEHS – funded program is intended to design nanostructured oxides with exception reactivity and specificity for use in advanced remediation schemes. Our aim is to achieve materials with reactivities and specificities that surpass the performance properties of conventional oxides, ion exchange resins and activated carbons. Our studies will lead to improved abiotic approaches to water purification. The targeted contaminants include chlorinated hydrocarbons as well as cationic and anionic forms of metals that are both superfund contaminants and members of the top 20 EPA hazardous substances (e.g., arsenic, lead, mercury, cadmium, and chromium). The basic chemistries we are developing should be applicable to the removal of inorganics from point-of-use drinking water as well as from industrial waste streams.

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    Helen P. Pollard
    Department: Anthropology
    E-mail: pollardh@msu.edu
    Web site: http://anthropology.msu.edu/blog/people/pollardh/

    Helen Perlstein Pollard has carried out archaeologial and ethnohistoric research in western Mexico since 1970. Her research and teaching deals with two broad issues: human ecology and the emergence and evolution of social, political and economic inequality. Within the context of human ecology she focuses on (1) human adaptation to environmental fluctuation and (2) the impact of humans on the environment in the context of the emergence and development of prehistoric states and empires. Her studies of prehistoric states focus on the emergence and evolution of social stratification, political centralization, and the political economies of archaic states and empires. Specifically, her research deals with central and west Mexico, especially Michoacán and the Purepecha\Tarascans, and the development of social theory in archaeology to understand the evolution of inequality by class, ethnicity, and gender.

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    William Porter
    Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
    E-mail: porterw@anr.msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~porterw/index.htm

    Bill Porter is newly appointed Boone and Crockett Chair of Wildlife Conservation at MSU. His responsibilities at Michigan State emphasize research and the application of science in shaping wildlife policy. He directs the Quantitative Wildlife Laboratory where he and his students explore the issues that are producing fundamental changes to wildlife conservation in North America. These issues include climate change, biofuels production, disease and stewardship of wildlife populations. His lab brings expertise in population dynamics, movement behavior and landscape ecology of wildlife populations. His teaching includes courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and emphasizes the application of wildlife science and leadership to conservation policy. Bill comes to MSU after more than 30 years on the faculty at the State University of New York (SUNY) in Syracuse where he was Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Director of the Adirondack Ecological Center, SUNY’s largest field station. While there, he and colleagues studied issues of sustainability in Adirondack Park.

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    David Poulson
    Department: Journalism
    E-mail: poulson@msu.edu
    Web site: http://ej.msu.edu/faculty-staff.php

    David Poulson is the associate director of the Knight Center for Environmental Journalism at MSU. He teaches environmental, investigative and computer-assisted reporting to graduate and undergraduate students. He also organizes and teaches workshops that help professional reporters better cover the environment. Those efforts include the center’s Great Lakes Environmental Journalism Training Institute for journalists working in the region’s states and provinces. He also organizes a separate national boot camp with the Society of Environmental Journalists for reporters new to covering the environment. In August 2008 he led a dozen reporters on a trip to Alaska to study and write about climate change. At MSU he also researches and experiments with alternative media forms including an environmental news aggregator and a citizen journalism effort that won national recognition from the Knight-Batten awards for innovations in journalism.

    He came to MSU in 2003 after a 21-year career as a newspaper reporter and editor, mostly covering the environment. He enjoys running, bicycling, teaching, camping, reading, writing, listening to jazz and playing it rather badly on the piano. He and his wife, Kris, have three children.

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    Wendy Powers
    Department: Animal Science, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
    E-mail: wpowers@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.ans.msu.edu/ans/department_faculty_staff/507/dr._wendy_powers

    Dr. Wendy Powers is a professor and Director of Environmental Stewardship for Animal Agriculture in the Departments of Animal Science and Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at MSU. She joined the faculty at MSU in November 2006 after being on faculty at Iowa State University for just under 10 years.

    As director, Dr. Powers coordinates environmental activities related to animal agriculture for the college. Wendy's primary research focus is on diet modification to alter odor and gaseous emissions and manure nutrient excretion working in a multispecies capacity. Extension efforts are currently focused on implementation of management practices to reduce environmental impact and addressing the concerns of rural citizens by improving understanding and communication.

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    Dennis B. Propst
    Department: Forestry
    E-mail: propst@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.for.msu.edu/pages/faculty/propst_d.html

    Dennis Propst’s research interests include human/natural resource interaction, public participation in park and protected areas policy and management, the economic impacts of recreation and tourism. His expertise is in the human dimensions of natural resource management and planning, outdoor recreation, social science research methodology and statistical analysis. Along with his Ph.D. in forestry, he holds minors in statistics and social psychology. He has 20-plus years of experience in the application of multivariate statistical procedures and social science research designs to park, outdoor recreation and natural resource-related research problems.

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    Jiaguo Qi
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: qi@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.globalchange.msu.edu/qi.html

    Jiaguo Qi is Director of the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, and Professor at MSU's Department of Geography. Dr. Qi also serves as a Project Scientist for NASA's MAIRS (Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Studies) program. His research focuses on two areas: 1) Integrating biophysical and social processes and methods in understanding land use and land cover change and 2) Transforming data into information and knowledge.

    Understanding the coupling of nature and human systems is important in global change research. The interactions between biophysical and social processes are intrinsically coupled but largely unknowns. To better understand the responses/feedbacks of the two coupled processes, Dr. Qi's research endeavor focuses on two fronts: 1) development of methodologies to quantify the linkages between them, and 2) development of geospatial tools to allow a quantification of spatio-temporal patterns and processes resulting from complex interactions between human and natural systems. Through research projects funded by different agencies including NASA, NSF, USDA, USAID, etc., he strives to use case studies in different parts of the world to understand the nature of the coupled nature-human systems. The geographic area of his research is global; with projects in North America, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Central Asia, East and West Africa, South America, and Australia. His recent research attempts to integrate environmental and social sciences to investigate the consequences of the socioeconomic reform on land degradation in China and climate change impact on human systems in East Africa.

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    Lucero Radonic
    Department: Anthropology
    E-mail:

    Lucero Radonic has a Ph.D. in Anthropology, with a minor in Geography, from the University of Arizona. Her research program lies at the intersection of political ecology and urban anthropology, and contributes to academic and policy debates on water governance and resource rights, urban indigeneity, and the right to the city. Her current project explores the historical relationship between the political ecology of water, urbanization, and indigenous rights in Northwestern Mexico, a region that faces continuous urban expansion and an intensifying water crisis due to high water demands and climate change. Her current research programs draws from past working experience in the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, the Arizona Water Resources Research Center, and the Arizona State Museum.

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    Gemma Reguera
    Department: Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
    E-mail: reguera@msu.edu
    Web site: http://mmg.msu.edu/124.html

    Gemma Reguera was named assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics and crop and soil sciences in August of 2006. Her research focuses on the adaptive responses of microbes to their natural environment, and she uses this information to find new biotechnology applications for microbial processes. Her lab is currently studying how the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens colonizes surfaces and lives as biofilms and how to genetically engineer Geobacter biofilms for applications in bioremediation of radioactive and toxic metal contaminants, nanotechnology and bioenergy.

    From 2002 to 2006, Reguera was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and from 2001 to 2002, she was a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard Medical School. Before that, she held research associate and assistant positions at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and the University of Oviedo in Spain. Reguera received a doctorate and a master's degree in microbiology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 2001 and 1994, respectively, and a doctorate and a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Oviedo, in 2001 and 1992, respectively.

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    Dawn Marie Reinhold
    Department: Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering
    E-mail: reinho17@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~reinho17

    Dawn Reinhold is an assistant professor in Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering. Her research group aims to advance use of plant-based ecological systems to address water quality issues, including pollution of waters by agricultural runoff, stormwater runoff, urban and agricultural wastewaters, and hazardous wastes. Research focuses on plant-based ecosystems, such as wetlands, filter strips, best management practices, and phytoremediation, and on how plants affect the fate of pollutants. Dawn received her doctorate in Environmental Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2007 and her bachelor's degree in Biological and Agricultural Engineering from Kansas State University in 2002.

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    Jeffrey M. Riedinger
    Department: International Studies & Programs
    E-mail: riedinge@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.isp.msu.edu/faculty/bios.htm

    Jeffrey Riedinger is Dean, International Studies and Programs; and Professor, Department of Community, Agriculture, Recreation, and Resource Studies.

    As a comparative political scientist, Riedinger has a developing area focus, with special emphasis on Southeast and East Asia. His work applies theories of political economy and state-society relations to problems of economic development. Riedinger is particularly interested in the way that political liberalization and democratization reforms affect the distribution of economic assets such as land, and in the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the formulation and implementation of development policies. Thematically, Riedinger's work focuses on the political economy of redistributive agrarian reform, the role of NGOs in shaping and implementing agricultural and environmental policy, sustainable agriculture and natural resource management, and the legal rights of indigenous populations.

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    Shawn J. Riley
    Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
    E-mail: rileysh2@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~rileysh2

    Dr. Riley's research activities are in discovery and integration of human and environmental dimensions of wildlife management. Current projects include: human dimensions of wildlife health management in the US; human-wildlife interactions and how stakeholders perceive interactions as impacts; how individuals and communities develop capacity for living with wildlife; antecedents to compliance with wildlife policies and regulations; perceptions of hunting in Swedish wildlife management; and, factors affecting agency capacity for managing fish and wildlife in North America.

    Shawn's outreach efforts focus on improving wildlife management through: building capacity within resource agencies to make effective, sustainable decisions; professional development for agency personnel; program evaluation; and diffusion of techniques to integrate human and environmental dimensions of management.

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    Phil (G. Philip) Robertson
    Department: Crop & Soil Sciences
    E-mail: robertson@kbs.msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/people/faculty/robertson

    Phil Robertson is University Distinguished Professor of Ecosystem Science in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences. Since 1988 he has directed the NSF Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program in Agricultural Ecology at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station

    Dr. Robertson's research interests include the biogeochemistry and ecology of field crop ecosystems, including biofuel systems, and in particular nitrogen and carbon dynamics, greenhouse gas fluxes, and the functional significance of microbial diversity in these systems. His undergraduate teaching includes Agricultural Ecology, Biogeochemistry, and Soil Biology courses.

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    Joan B. Rose
    Department: Fisheries & Wildlife, Crop & Soil Sciences and Micro/Molecular Genetics
    E-mail: rosejo@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~rosejo/JoanRose.htm

    At MSU, Dr. Joan Rose serves as the Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research, the Co-Director of the Center for Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment (CAMRA) and the Director of the Center for Water Sciences (CWS).

    Dr. Rose is an international expert in water microbiology, water quality and public health safety. She has been involved in the investigation of numerous waterborne outbreaks world-wide. Her work has examined new molecular methods for waterborne pathogens and zoonotic agents such as Cryptosporidium and enteric viruses and source tracking techniques. She has been involved in the study of water supplies, water used for food production, and coastal environments as well as drinking water treatment, wastewater treatment, reclaimed water and water reuse. She specifically interested in microbial pathogen transport in coastal systems and risks to recreational waters. She has been involved in the study of climate factors on water quality. Dr. Rose has been involved in the development of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) frameworks, methods and data sets and considered one of the international experts in this evolving arena.

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    Robert A. Roth
    Department: Pharmacology & Toxicology
    E-mail: rothr@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.phmtox.msu.edu/people/faculty/rothprint.htm

    Researchers in my laboratory are interested in inflammation as a determinant of susceptibility to the toxic effects of drugs and other chemical agents. All of us experience episodes of inflammation. We are interested in how modest inflammation can make individuals particularly sensitive to toxic chemicals. We have found that a small dose of endotoxin that is without effect by itself markedly enhances the hepatotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1, as well as other toxic agents that occur in our food or environment. Thus, endotoxin exposure or underlying inflammation from other causes may be an important determinant of sensitivity of people and animals to toxic chemicals. Our team is working to characterize this inflammation-induced augmentation of toxicity and to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie it.

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    Brian M. Roth
    Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
    E-mail: rothbri@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/people/faculty.php

    ESPP Profile

    My research interests are in interactions between native and non-native species that can lead to alternative configurations of aquatic biota and in spatially-explicit modeling methodologies. I also plan to investigate how fish movements differ on both small and large spatial and temporal scales and how to integrate this information in spatially-explicit models that can be used to inform management strategies that depend on assumptions of movement, or lack thereof.

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    David Rothstein
    Department: Forestry
    E-mail: rothste2@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.for.msu.edu/pages/faculty/rothstein_d.html

    The goal of my research program is to develop a mechanistic understanding of processes driving the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients in both natural and managed forests. In particular, I am interested in studying feedbacks within the plant-soil system that control both the availability of nutrients in soil, and losses of nutrients from ecosystems. This work involves research at a wide range of scales: from the quantification of ecosystem-level fluxes of carbon and nutrients to the study of plant and microbial metabolism.

    Current research projects include:

    • Organic N Cycling in Temperate Deciduous Forests
    • Wildfire, Harvesting and Biogeochemistry of Michigan Jack Pine Forests
    • Land Use-Land Cover Change and Regional C Storage in the Upper Yangtze
    • River Basin
    • Sustainable fertility management in Michigan Christmas tree plantations

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    Steven I. Safferman
    Department: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
    E-mail: safferma@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/age/safferman.html

    My holistic research approach is to consider “waste” as a resource to be returned to beneficial function within the watershed. Included are nutrients, compost, bioenergy, and water. Such an approach needs to be comprehensive. It involves science, engineering, economics, and policy. Partnerships between Universities, stakeholders, and government agencies are critical. General research topics that I am exploring center around innovative animal waste management strategies for large and small producers, biological, chemical and physical treatment technologies for nitrogen and phosphorus control, passive nutrient, low-tech treatment systems for storm drains, the use of compost originating from agricultural waste in storm water best management practices, innovative physical and chemical processes for on-site wastewater treatment technologies, and industrial assessments to minimize water use and wastewater production.

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    Gene R. Safir
    Department: Plant Pathology
    E-mail: safir@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.plantpathology.msu.edu/SafirGene/tabid/104/Default.aspx

    Dr. Safir is a Professor in the Dept. of Plant Pathology. He worked for several years on the remote detection of crops and crop stresses and now he concentrates on the expansion of plant and disease models from field to regional scales. He is also interested in the effects of crop phenology on diseases and greenhouse gasses and on ecological and weather based indicators of plant stress. He conducts his research in the Computational Ecology and Visualization Laboratory at MSU.

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    Orlando Sarnelle
    Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
    E-mail: sarnelle@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~sarnelle/

    I am a limnologist and ecologist with relatively broad interests. A major theme in my research has been to understand the roles that interactions among aquatic populations (primarily phytoplankton and zooplankton) play in population and community dynamics within lakes. I am also interested in how these interactions impact the overall functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The approach that I take to questions relies very heavily on field experimentation, and I am very interested in assessing how well such experiments inform us about processes in nature.

    Selected projects:

    • Interactions between Daphnia and cyanobacteria in eutrophic lakes
    • Zebra mussels and toxic algal blooms in lakes- We are investigating the link between zebra mussel invasion and the incidence and severity of blue-green algal blooms in Michigan lakes.
    • High Sierra Experimental Lakes- We are examining how the removal of an exotic predator influences population, community and ecosystem dynamics at the whole-lake scale.
    • Meta-analysis- I have been part of a working group sponsored by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis examining issues regarding the application of meta-analysis to ecological questions.

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    Randall Schaetzl
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: soils@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/schaetzl/index2.html

    I study soils, landforms and biota in the context of environmental change. Specifically, I study the spatial interactions and process linkages among soil/surficial physical systems (including eolian systems) and (i) geomorphology, (ii) climate and hydrology, and/or (iii) biota.

    I work on research topics related to soil gemorphology and geography, pedogenic processes, soil genesis and soil water, and plant geography. Much of my past work has centered on the processes of podzolization and lessivage (clay translocation). Currently, I am most involved in mapping and explaining loess deposits in Wisconsin and Michigan.

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    Douglas W. Schemske
    Department: Plant Biology
    E-mail: schem@msu.edu
    Web site: http://plantbiology.msu.edu/faculty/faculty-research/doug-schemske/

    The goal of my research is to characterize the mechanisms of adaptation. This requires information on both the ecological significance of putative adaptive traits as well as an understanding of their genetic basis....A central theme of my work is the link between temporal and spatial variation in ecological conditions and the adaptive differentiation of populations and species. I rely on ecological and genetic approaches to investigate the origin and maintenance of biological diversity Such complex problems often require interdisciplinary solutions. I have established a number of rewarding collaborations that have greatly expanded the scope of my research program....My long-term goal is to promote the study of adaptation at all levels, from the gene to the population.

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    Laura Schmitt Olabisi
    Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies; Environmental Science and Policy Program
    E-mail: schmi420@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.csus.msu.edu/people/laura_schmitt_olabisi

    ESPP Profile

    I am a quantitative modeler exploring the dependence of human economies and societies on material and energy flows provided by natural systems. I work with system dynamics, geographic and statistical models to ask questions about some of the most important threats to the sustainability of complex human and natural systems. My past and present research has addressed soil erosion, population growth, greenhouse gas emissions, water sustainability, and land use change, for example. I'm also interested in using participatory techniques to integrate knowledge streams from natural scientists, social scientists, policymakers, and local experts. Combining the learning generated through these participatory processes with the insights quantitative modeling can provide-all in the service of promoting sustainable development and adaptive capacity-will be a key focus of my future research.

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    Gerhardus Schultink
    Department: Community, Agriculture, Recreation & Resource Studies
    E-mail: schultin@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.carrs.msu.edu/faculty/viewPage.php?netID=schultin

    Professor Schultink conducts research and teaches international resource development, comparative environmental policy, land use and environmental planning and environmental impact assessment at the Department of Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies. He also served as the Associate Director of the Land Policy Institute with responsibilities for international land use planning, policy and development studies. His extensive publication record reflects more than 30 years experience in natural resource surveys, sector and impact assessment, land use planning, rural economic development and policy analysis. He has provided international and domestic consultancies for private sector firms, government agencies, such as USAID, the USDA, as well as international organizations, such as FAO, UNDP and the World Bank, and numerous country governments. Currently he directs various land tenure, administration and development projects.

    He has worked with the Fulbright Foundation to establish an Environmental Protection Center in Thailand, with the Japanese Science Foundation and various Japanese universities on regional and agricultural planning issues, and with European universities on academic program reviews in the environmental and life sciences.

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    Mark J. Scriber
    Department: Entomology
    E-mail: scriber@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.ent.msu.edu/Directory/Facultypages/scriber/tabid/170/Default.aspx

    The geographical (spatial) variation in adaptive traits of hybridizing species of insects has been the central focus of recent research in the evolutionary genetics of herbivores. Biotic and abiotic factors affecting the distribution, ecology, and societal impacts of herbivorous insects have recently undergone dramatic changes since the regional climate warming across the Great Lakes and New England. These concerns also deal with risk perception from transgenic plants (and nontarget issues with gypsy moths and forests as well as transgenic corn and butterflies). The importance of hybrid zones and long-range migratory behavior for global biodiversity is also under investigation at the community ecology/ecosystem level.

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    Susan E.M. Selke
    Department: Packaging
    E-mail: sselke@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.packaging.msu.edu/packaging/faculty/dr10

    Broad research interests within the general area of packaging and the environment. Research activities include plastics recycling, biodegradable plastics, plastic/natural fiber composites, and lifecycle assessment. Specific examples include understanding the role of uncertainty in lifecycle analysis, use of microcellular foaming to improve the performance of HDPE/PP blends and composites of those blends with wood fibers; modeling the migration of contaminants in recycled plastic through a functional barrier of virgin plastic and into a food or beverage product; performance of bio-based and petrochemical-based biodegradable plastics; microcellular foaming of a biodegradable polyester; and incorporation of zeolites into a biodegradable plastic to provide active packaging functionality.

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    Thomas D. Sharkey
    Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    E-mail: tsharkey@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.bch.msu.edu/faculty/sharkey.htm

    My lab studies the interactions between the biosphere and atmosphere with emphasis on the biochemical and biophysical processes that control gas exchange. We have several projects on photosynthetic responses to carbon dioxide, emphasizing elevated carbon dioxide because this will continue to increase in the atmosphere. A second major area of research is the emission of isoprene from many trees, especially oaks and poplars. This hydrocarbon helps trees tolerate high leaf temperature caused by sunlight but when NOx pollution is present, isoprene from trees can lead to ozone formation. Our work is focused on the biochemical and molecular regulation of the rate of isoprene emission, as well as the evolution of this trait.

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    Robert Shupp
    Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
    E-mail: shupprob@anr.msu.edu
    Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~shupprob/

    Robert Shupp is an Assistant Professor at MSU in the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics. His research focuses on applying experimental economic methods to a variety of issues in areas such as environmental, development and behavioral economics. Shupp holds a Ph.D. in economics from Indian University and a bachelor's degree in economics from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA.

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    David L. Skole
    Department: Forestry
    E-mail: skole@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.for.msu.edu/pages/faculty/skole_d.html

    David L. Skole is Professor of Forestry at Michigan State University. He has more than 25 years experience with research on the global carbon cycle and climate change. He was instrumental in constructing the first numerical global carbon model, and has been spearheading the integration of satellite based remote sensing into carbon accounting models. He was formally recognized for his climate change research as an official member of the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He is now active in the emerging carbon financial markets and applications of his research to carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation projects in developing countries.

    He has been active in developing methods for carbon offsets under cap and trade carbon regulations. He is a member of the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX), and serves as a member of its Offsets and Forestry Committees. He is also Chair of a Technical Advisory Committee of the CCX on small holder agriculture procedures. Dr. Skole is past chair of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education. He is a member of several committees of the National Academies including Geographic Sciences Committee and the Committee on Geographical Foundations of Agenda 21 that lead to US State Department recommendations at the World Summit on Sustainable Development. He served as a member of the Committee to Review the US Climate Change Science Program and several other Academies committees related to environment and climate.

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    Thomas M. Smith
    Department: Institute of Agricultural Technology
    E-mail: smitht48@msu.edu
    Web site: http://iat.msu.edu/iat/contact_us

    Thomas M. Smith is a specialist with the Institute of Agricultural Technology (IAT). His major responsibilities are developing and enhancing Community College Partnerships to collaboratively offer IAT Certificate programs at the local level. Part of this effort includes developing new program areas to meet the specific social, economic and educational needs of the local community. Tom is interested in developing collaborations with other MSU faculty to help develop new credit and non-credit training and educational programs that meet the broad mission of IAT and address specific community needs, both in Michigan and beyond. He is also interested in a diverse range of applied research activities that further these interests.

    He brings business experience to his position at MSU, having owned and operated businesses in the green industry and technology transfer for over 25 years. Tom holds a BS and MS in Crop & Soil Science - Turfgrass Management from MSU.

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    Alvin J.M. Smucker
    Department: Crop & Soil Sciences
    E-mail: smucker@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~smucker

    Focus on soil biophysics. Research projects underway are:

    • Terrestrial sequestration of carbon (C)
    • Plant C contributions to the formation and function of soil aggregation processes
    • Demographics of plant root systems
    • Nutrient flux in soil profiles and soil aggregates

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    Patricia A. Soranno
    Department: Fisheries and Wildlife
    E-mail: soranno@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~soranno/

    As a landscape limnologist, the focus of my research is to gain a better understanding of lakes and their place in the landscape. Lakes can be studied at three important spatial scales: within-lake, lake catchment, and the landscape, and my research includes all three. My main lines of research are: (1) The effects of land use on lake nutrients and biological communities; (2) Development of a landscape-context paradigm for lake ecosystems; (3) The application of a landscape-context paradigm to lake assessment and management; and (4) Quantifying ecosystem reference conditions.

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    Ajit K. Srivastava
    Department: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
    E-mail: srivasta@egr.msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/age/srivastava.html

    Research Interests:

    • Machinery Systems for Food Production and Processing
    • Dimensional Analysis and Similitude
    • Bioenergy / Supply Chain of Feedstock

    One current project is analysis and modeling of woody biomass supply chain for bioenergy. A project is also underway to convert turkey litter to energy via direct combustion; this will involve redesigning the burner, pelletizing turkey litter, studying gas emissions, and heating a greenhouse.

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    Daniel P. Steel
    Department: Philosophy
    E-mail: steel@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~steel

    My specialization is in the philosophy of science with a particular emphasis on problems of evidence and causal inference as they arise in biology and social science. One major area of my research focuses on problems relating to extrapolating causal conclusions from one context—such as an animal experiment or a pilot study—to another—such as humans or a full scale implementation of a program. I address this issue from a philosophy of science perspective in my book, Across the Boundaries: Extrapolation in Biology and Social Science (2008 Oxford University Press). My current research project explores how to incorporate social and ethical values into policy-relevant scientific results without compromising scientific integrity, and in particular how this question connects to the precautionary principle.

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    Jan (Robert) Stevenson
    Department: Zoology
    E-mail: rjstev@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~rjstev/

    I employ my technical expertise in algal taxonomy and ecology to test ecological theory and to develop approaches for solving environmental problems. I am particularly interested in how ecological systems respond to environmental change. I also work with federal and state officials to develop protocols for ecological assessment. Working with resource managers and policy makers often stimulates new directions for my research. Most of my projects use field observations, experiments, and modeling to better understand the effects of natural and human factors on algae and the role of algae in aquatic ecosystems. Field studies are used to identify interesting patterns in nature that may indicate an environmental problem or an interesting natural phenomenon. Manipulative experiments in artificial streams and mesocosms are used to confirm cause-effect relationships. I use models to scale our observations up to better understand cause-effect relations among natural and anthropogenic factors and ecological conditions.

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    Jon Sticklen
    Department: Computer Science and Engineering
    E-mail: sticklen@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~sticklen/

    I serve as the Director of the Center for Engineering Education Research at MSU. CEER@MSU was created in June, 2009, with a mandate to expand engineering education research in our College, to engage more faculty in education research, and to work collaboratively with colleagues in other Colleges who are researching issues in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education - the STEM areas.

    My early research career focused on knowledge-based systems (aka "expert systems"), a subfield of artificial intelligence. Applications developed were across a broad range of domains including applied research in diagnostics for high performance aircraft, qualitative modeling of landscape level architectures, intelligent tutoring systems support of university level instruction, and expert systems support for design and fabrication of structures made from polymer composites. More recently, for the last decade I have pursued engineering education research focused on early engineering.

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    John Stone
    Department: Center for the Study of Standards in Society (CS3)
    E-mail: jvstone@msu.edu
    Web site: http://cs3.msu.edu/people/profile/stone-john/

    John V. Stone is Associate Director and Senior Research Scientist at the Center for the Study of Standards in Society (CS3) at MSU. He holds a Ph.D. and an MA in Applied Anthropology, both from the University of South Florida, and a BA in Anthropology from Michigan State. John assists with numerous activities at CS3, including grant writing, research, and management, and graduate course development and teaching. His primary research interests are in the participatory dimensions of environmental management and agrifood standards development and implementation, and particularly ethnographic methodological applications to promote more equitable social access in those processes. John has managed numerous social research projects, authored more than 20 scientific publications and technical reports, and made more than 35 presentations to professional societies and associations. He co-founded the Risk Assessment and Policy Association and holds membership in the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), the American Anthropological Association, and the International Associations for Public Participation and Impact Assessment, respectively. John received the EPA/SfAA Environmental Anthropology Fellowship in 1999, and served as the inaugural Fellow to the Great Lakes Commission Fellowship Program.

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    Diana Stuart
    Department: Sociology; Kellogg Biological Station
    E-mail: dstuart@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.kbs.msu.edu/people/faculty/diana-stuart

    ESPP Profile

    Dr. Stuart holds a joint appointment through the Kellogg Biological Station and the Department of Sociology at MSU. In her research, Dr. Stuart focuses on the social aspects of environmental and natural resource issues. Her work primarily focuses on agriculture and other “managed” landscapes. In many cases, information exists to guide the use of more sustainable management practices that can reduce negative environmental impacts. However, barriers often exist that can prevent the adoption of these practices. These barriers include social, cultural, political and economic factors that constrain the choices of farmers and other land managers. Through the use of interviews, surveys, and focus groups, Dr. Stuart’s work aims to explore these barriers and how they might be addressed. While her work is very applied, it also remains theoretically grounded. She draws from environmental sociology and science and technology studies to contextualize her research and to contribute towards larger discussions regarding nature, society, and the environment.

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    Nathan Swenson
    Department: Plant Biology
    E-mail: swensonn@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~swensonn

    ESPP Profile

    Nathan G. Swenson, Ph.D. (University of Arizona) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant Biology. His central focus is on plant functional ecology and evolution. A major aim is to understand how the evolution of plant function influences ecological interactions and vice versa. More specific research directions include:

    • Community Ecology of Tropical and Temperate Forests From a Functional and Phylogenetic Perspective
    • Functional and Phylogenetic Investigations of Species Diversity Gradients and Anomalies
    • The Evolution of Plant Functional Diversity
    • The Geography of Plant Form and Function

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    Scott M. Swinton
    Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
    E-mail: swintons@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/swinton

    Scott Swinton teaches agricultural production economics and ecological economics. His economic research focuses on agriculture as a managed ecosystem, focusing on management and policy analysis for enhanced ecosystem services. He concentrates on problems involving crop pest and nutrient management, precision agriculture, resource conservation, and management of risks to human health and income. Besides his work on U.S. farming, he is engaged in research on agricultural and natural resource management in Latin America and Africa.

    Professional Interests:

    • Design of incentives to induce adoption of environmentally beneficial farming technologies
    • Valuation of ecosystem services linked to agriculture
    • Design of sustainable bioenergy production systems
    • Spatial data analysis methods
    • Environmental economic impact analysis
    • Assessment of alternative pest and nutrient management policies and practices

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    Matt Syal
    Department: Construction Management Program, School of Planning, Design, and Construction
    E-mail: syalm@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~syalm

    Research interests in sustainable construction management:

    • Impact of LEED® Projects on Contractors, Construction Managers and Sub Contractors
    • Sustainable / Green Guidelines in the U.S. and India
    • Sustainable Planning, Design and Construction at MSU
    • Health Impacts and Life Cycle Analysis of Green Homes and Buildings

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    Bruno Takahashi
    Department: School of Journalism
    E-mail: btakahas@msu.edu

    Dr. Takahashi is the newest faculty in the Knight Center for Environmental Journalism. His interests are in environmental communication and journalism, especially in regards to environmental discourses, environmental behaviors, media coverage of environmental issues, risk communication, international journalism, and public participation and conflict resolution. He received his doctorate in Environmental Science from the State University of New York where he studied Environmental Communication and Participatory Processes. He has a bachelor's degree from the University of Lima, Peru.

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    Volodymyr V. Tarabara
    Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
    E-mail: tarabara@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/cee/people/tarabara.html

    Dr. Tarabara's research focuses on fundamental aspects of membrane-based separation processes applied to water treatment and quality control. Behavior and use of nanoparticles in membrane separation systems is of especial interest.

    Current externally funded research projects include:

    • NSF PIRE: New generation synthetic membranes - Nanotechnology for drinking water safety
    • NSF NIRT: Self-cleaning ceremic membranes for the removal of natural and synthetic nanomaterials from drinking water using hybrid ozonation-nanofiltration
    • EPA STAR: On-chip PCR, nanoparticles, and virulence/marker genes for simultaneous detection of 20 waterborne pathogens
    • NSF I/UCRC and MI Swaco: Crossflow filtration hydrocyclone for the separation of oil-in-water emulsions

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    William W. Taylor
    Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
    E-mail: taylorw@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/~taylorw/research.htm

    Bill Taylor is University Distinguished Professor in Global Fisheries Sustainability. His research interests include: Great Lakes fisheries ecology, population dynamics and management. U.S.-Canada fishery resource policy and management. Integration of environmental policy and management from a local to global perspective.

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    Brian J. Teppen
    Department: Crop & Soil Sciences
    E-mail: teppen@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~teppen/

    In building an understanding of molecular behavior within environmental systems, emerging technologies in condensed-phase molecular modeling are proving useful for a) constraining the interpretations of spectroscopic and diffraction data, b) stimulating new hypotheses and new approaches to experimentation, and c) performing truly predictive simulations of properties not amenable to experiment. Molecular modeling tools have traditionally been tailored toward proteins and other biochemical organic systems, but I have worked toward expanding their application to environmentally relevant systems such as soil minerals and aqueous species at colloid-solution interfaces. My research has focused on the development, validation, and application of both classical- and quantum-physics molecular models for aqueous solutions, chemical contaminants, and the colloidal materials that control adsorption and chemical speciation in soils, sediments, and groundwaters. I have been the focal point of a diverse team (physical chemists, soil chemists, geophysicists, and environmental engineers) that develops and validates such models, then applies them to simulations of practical systems. A strength of our developmental work is frequent validation of our models using diverse spectroscopic, diffraction, and thermodynamic data. My goals are to develop robust models for the most important environmental colloids and to use the models to accurately predict a greater variety of kinetic and thermodynamic information.

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    Paul B. Thompson
    Department: Philosophy; Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies; Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economic
    E-mail: thomp649@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/thompson

    Paul Thompson is W. K. Kellogg Chair in Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics. His research and teaching issues cover the full range of environmental philosophy but are especially focused on three themes:

    • The assessment, management and communication of environmental risks
    • Ethical issues associated with genetic engineering of microbes, plants and non-human animals
    • The philosophy of agriculture, including sustainability and agrarianism

    He also works on broad issues in the philosophy of technology, and has recently undertaken a program of research on "technological commodification," which has grown out of his work on the ethics of genetic transformation.

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    Laurie G. Thorp
    Department: Residential Initiative on the Study of the Environment (RISE) Program
    E-mail: thorpl@msu.edu
    Web site: http://naturalscience.msu.edu/students/rise/

    Laurie Thorp directs the Residential Initiative on the Study of the Environment (RISE) program. RISE is an undergraduate academic specialization serving the colleges of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Communication Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Natural Science and Social Sciences. She is also associate director of MSU's new undergraduate Sustainability Specialization. She is interested in alternative business models for the food system and is co-advisor for the MSU Student Organic Farm.

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    James M. Tiedje
    Department: Crop & Soil Sciences, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
    E-mail: tiedjej@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.cme.msu.edu/tiedjelab/jtiedje.shtml

    Dr. Tiedje is University Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and of Crop and Soil Sciences, and is Director of the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University. His research focuses on microbial ecology, physiology and diversity, especially regarding the nitrogen cycle, biodegradation of environmental pollutants and use of molecular methods to understand microbial community structure and function. His group has discovered several microbes that live by halorespiration on chlorinated solvents and is using genomics to better understand ecological functions, endemism and niche adaptation. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of Applied and Environmental Microbiology and Editor of Microbial and Molecular Biology Reviews. He has over 350 refereed papers including seven in Science and Nature. He shared the 1992 Finley Prize of UNESCO for research contributions in microbiology of international significance, is Fellow of the AAAS (The American Association for the Advancement of Science), the American Academy of Microbiology, and the Soil Science Society of America, and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

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    Heather Triezenberg
    Department: MSU Extension Greening Michigan Institute
    E-mail: vanden64@msu.edu

    As Extension Specialist and Program Coordinator, Dr. Heather Triezenberg coordinates the statewide Sea Grant Extension Program in collaboration with Michigan State University Extension Greening Michigan Institute. Michigan Sea Grant Extension educators work with stakeholders on critical Great Lakes issues, such as resilient communities and economies, healthy coastal ecosystems, sustainable fisheries and aquaculture, environmental literacy and other issues. Triezenberg is interested in resilient coastal community development and healthy coastal ecosystems. Her research explores how stakeholders perceive risks related to critical issues within the Great Lakes to inform communication efforts, citizen involvement in research (e.g., Citizen Science), and program evaluation. She is also interested in the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and other quantitative methods to better understand stakeholders’ perceptions and actions as well as the incorporation of human dimensions data into management modeling and decision-making.

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    James E. Trosko
    Department: Pediatrics & Human Development
    E-mail: james.trosko@ht.msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.iet.msu.edu/Faculty/Trosko.html

    The Trosko lab focuses on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. His initial research involved the study of radiation-induced mammalian mutagenesis. This led to the discovery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair in normal human cells and the lack of DNA repair and increased mutagenesis in the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum syndrome. Later work with the tumor promoter, phorbolester, he discovered that the inhibition by tumor-promoting chemicals, oncogenes and growth factors were related to the mechanism of tumor promotion by their shared ability to modulate gap junction function. His team then developed several in vitro assays to detect chemical modulators of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) (e.g., metabolic cooperation assays; fluorescent recovery after photobleaching; scrape loading dye transfer, etc.) Later they found that modulation of GJIC was related to chemical induced teratogenesis, reproductive dysfunction and neurotoxicity. Most recently, his group has demonstrated that normal human epithelial stem cells could be isolated from kidney tissues and breast tissues. In addition, anti-tumor chemicals, as well as tumor suppressor genes appear to up-regulate GJIC in a manner opposite to tumor promoters and oncogenes. He has recently discovered biomarkers for adult human stem cells that has provided strong evidence for the "stem cell theory" of cancer.

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    E. Michael Unsworth
    Department: Collections Management
    E-mail: unsworth@mail.lib.msu.edu
    Web site: http://staff.lib.msu.edu/unsworth/

    My primary research is the import of solid waste from the Canadian Province of Ontario into Michigan.

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    Brad L. Upham
    Department: Pediatrics & Human Development
    E-mail: upham@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.iet.msu.edu/Faculty/Upham.html

    My research projects involve determining the cellular mechanisms by which nutrition, oxidative stress, and environmental and food-borne contaminants affect cell proliferative, differentiation and apoptotic processes that ultimately cumulates into states of human diseases such as cancer. Studies on cellular mechanisms focus primarily on how intracellular signal transduction pathways and gap junctional intercellular communication collaboratively orchestrate the epigenetic expression of genes in stem cell model systems. Bioassays of gap junctional intercellular communication are also used to estimate the risk of epigenetic toxicity of environmental toxicants in the design of engineered environmental remediation systems.

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    Gerald Urquhart
    Department: Lyman Briggs College
    E-mail: urquhart@msu.edu
    Web site: https://www.msu.edu/~urquhart/

    My research focuses on the impacts of both natural and human disturbance on tropical forests and their biodiversity. My approaches include ecology, paleoecology, biogeography, and more recently, an interdisciplinary combination of ecology and economics. I have two significant questions in my research: 1) How does extension of the global economy into remote tropical regions affect the interaction of humans and natural resources? and 2) What are the ecological patterns and principles of composition, disturbance, regeneration and restoration of tropical swamp forests? The tropical ecosystems at the center of my studies are located in remote areas of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua, where I am have been conducting research since 1992.

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    Remke L. Van Dam
    Department: Geological Sciences
    E-mail: rvd@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~rvd/

    My research interests are in the application and improvement of near-surface geophysical methods for hydrological and engineering problems, sedimentology and stratigraphy, issues of environmental change, and characterization of soils.

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    Thomas A. Vogel
    Department: Geological Sciences
    E-mail: vogel@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~vogel

    Volcanic hazards and related topics are important aspects of environment science and policy in countries with volcanoes, and we have an active group here at MSU working on this problem. One of my interests in the past few years (in Central America and the Philippines) is to promote the development and application of measures to minimize loss of life and property caused by volcanic eruptions, landslides, mudflows, lahars, etc. What types of volcanic hazards do local residents face and where can they go to avoid dangers? These questions are difficult to answer because there are many types of volcanic eruptions, which produce different types of volcanic hazards. Most of our work has been with the most dangerous of all volcanic eruptions - ash flows. We are working on these types of eruptions in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and the Philippines, and we are currently involved in drilling an active volcano at Unzen Japan to evaluate how these eruptions occur. Our current research in the Philippines involves documenting past ash-flow eruptions in the metropolitan Manila area. We are currently working with the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology; and the National Institute of Geological Sciences on this problem. Some of our colleagues are involved in remote sensing, especially of volcanic hazards due to volcanic ash, gas and aerosol clouds. The remote sensing methods can be used for science and hazard mitigation.

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    Tom Voice
    Department: Civil & Environmental Engineering
    E-mail: voice@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/cee/people/voice.html

    Professor Voice’s research involves the mass-transfer of chemical contaminants in systems of environmental interest, with emphasis on interactions between pollutants and soils, sediments, and suspended solids. Current research is focused on the environmental impact and remediation of terrestrial chemical spills. He is involved in research on water and waste treatment systems that utilize activated carbon absorption. Professor Voice maintains a strong secondary interest in the development of new and improved methods for chemical analysis.

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    Igor Vojnovic
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: vojnovic@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/vojnovic.html

    Research interests are in the areas of environmental and social justice, with a particular focus on how theories of equity apply to urban form and natural environments. The approach to the research on urban form involves social, environmental, and economic assessments of the interrelationship between the built environment and human activity patterns. The analysis is multidisciplinary, and ranges from how economic incentives distort urban and natural environments to design criteria in city building.

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    Robert T. Walker
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: rwalker@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/walker/index2b.html

    I am an economic geographer who provides theoretical descriptions of land-use and land-cover change processes wherever they occur. My special interest is in accounting for the spatial articulation of such changes, what an ecologist might refer to as landscape evolution. The main objective of my research is to develop theoretical frameworks, not to conduct regional case studies. Economic geography (including regional science) possesses models and paradigms of great potential utility in studies of land-use and land-cover change, but to date they have been little utilized. I see my work as establishing a link between a set of traditional models and an issue of growing global concern. Because economic geography doesn’t always possess the “right” model for the issue at hand, I borrow from economics, anthropology, and sociology to frame some of my work, given its focus on behavior at the level of individual land managers.

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    Joanne M. Westphal
    Department: Landscape Architecture, School of Planning, Design, and Construction
    E-mail: westphal@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.spdc.msu.edu/SPDC/Landscape_Architecture_Faculty

    Dr. Westphal is a landscape architect and practicing licensed physician. She is a Fellow in both the American Society of Landscape Architects and the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture. As a faculty member in SPDC, she focuses on issues of health in the built environment, therapeutic site design, context-sensitive design, and research methodology. Her work includes the evaluation of construction standards to promote human wellness; the efficacy of design to complement medical treatment protocols in hospitals and nursing homes; the examination of communities to promote active living throughout the seasons; and the need for place identification, resource sustainability and open space/green corridor protection in the American landscape.

    Research interests encompass two broad areas of the environment: 1) factors that affect human health in the built environment, and 2) issues affecting regional landscape identity, sustainability, and resource protection. Current work focuses on assessment strategies to document the health benefits of gardens and open space to patient and non-patient groups as a part of "evidence-based design", including the use of virtual reality, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), "intended outcomes measures", and post-occupancy evaluation. In terms of land use, current work evaluates standards & criteria for site sustainability; performance standards for steep green roof systems (i.e., micro-climate effects, stormwater management, thermal conductivity, and urban wildlife/habitat potential); and seasonal factors affecting walking & biking in cold climate communities.

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    Kyle Powys Whyte
    Department: Philosophy
    E-mail: kwhyte@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.philosophy.msu.edu/index.php?cID=202

    ESPP Profile

    Kyle Powys Whyte is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy and affiliated faculty at the Center for the Study of Standards in Society (CS3), the Peace and Justice Studies Specialization, and the American Indian Studies Program. He is an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Dr. Whyte writes on issues in environmental justice, the philosophies of science and technology, and American Indian philosophy. His articles are published in journals such as Synthese, Agricultural & Environmental Ethics, Knowledge, Technology & Policy, Ethics, Place & Environment, Continental Philosophy Review, Environmental Philosophy, Philosophy & Technology, Public Integrity, and Rural Social Sciences, and his research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Spencer Foundation, and National Endowment for the Humanities. He is a member of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Public Philosophy, Michigan Environmental and Natural Resources Governance Program, and Michigan Environmental Justice Working Group, and is a 2009 recipient of the K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award from the Association of American Colleges & Universities.

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    David S. Wiley
    Department: Sociology
    E-mail: wiley@msu.edu
    Web site: http://sociology.msu.edu/dwiley.html

    David Wiley (Professor) (Ph.D., Princeton) began his leadership role as Interim Chair of the Department of Sociology in October 2010. Dr. Wiley specializes in social inequality, social ecology of Africa and its environment (rural and urban), social movements, social stratification and religion, and internationalization of higher education. His major research projects include a) the militarization of Africa, b) community mobilization on environment and development in South Africa (focus Durban), c) socio-economic impacts of biological change on Lake Victoria (Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania), d) stratification and religion in the U.S. and Zambia, e) African urbanization and housing in Zambia and South Africa, and e) internationalization of U.S. higher education. He is former director of the MSU African Studies Center (1978-2008).

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    Logan D.A. Williams
    Department: Sociology
    E-mail: will2734@msu.edu
    Web site: http://logandawilliams.weebly.com/

    Knowledge from the Margins: Users, Producers and Technology Choice Moving Sciences From Below: I am working on my first book which describes community ophthalmology NGOs in South Asia and East Africa. These professionals are re-inventing surgical sciences and ophthalmic technologies, and creating new hospital management techniques in order to fight avoidable blindness worldwide. I am using critical theory from Technology Studies, Political Sociology of Science & Technology, and Postcolonial Studies in order to: (1) describe "civil society research" (Hess 2009) being performed by these domestic NGOs in less economically developed countries; (2) explain the processes by which these innovations circulate throughout the world – to the benefit of both low-income patients and global modern science. Rural Women, Global Climate Change and Clean Cookstoves: In this project I will use qualitative field methods to investigate the power dynamics of the production and dissemination of clean cookstoves, and its co-construction with gender, scientific literacy, and health. I have started preliminary interviews of engineers and scientists involved in mitigating climate change and improving women's health. They are introducing efficient cook stoves and novel information and communications technologies to measure atmospheric brown clouds in South Asia and East Africa.

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    Julie A. Winkler
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: winkler@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/winkler.html

    My primary research interests are:

    • Synoptic climatology
    • Regional climate variability and change

    Synoptic climatology is concerned with understanding the linkages between the occurrence of weather phenomena and atmospheric circulation at all scales. My work has focused on the central United States and includes research on heavy precipitation events, diurnal variations in the characteristics of lightning flashes, the mesoscale structure of midlatitude cyclones, and the climatology of low-level jets. In terms of climate change research, I have evaluated the output of Global Climate Models (GCMs) in light of the potential application to regional climate change studies, developed downscaling methodologies for the construction of local/regional climate scenarios, and proposed methods for estimating the uncertainty surrounding estimates of climate change at the regional scale. I have also studied the potential impacts of climate change on specialized agriculture in the Great Lakes region.

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    Antoinette M.G.A. WinklerPrins
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: antoinet@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.msu.edu/~antoinet

    My research interests sit at the intersection of human and physical geography. My training at the undergraduate level was in urban geography, but at the Ph.D. level gravitated more toward physical, especially soil geography and geomorphology. My minor was soil science (pedology). I describe myself as a cultural/ political/historical ecologist working on issues of landscape transformation in the Brazilian Amazon. I am most interested in how people have and continue to transform their landscapes as they continually adapt and adjust both themselves and their environment to changing socio-economic circumstances.

    Examples of research projects:

    • local environmental knowledge, especially soil and agronomic knowledge, and how it can inform sustainable development strategies (in Brazil, Mexico, Kenya, Michigan);
    • urban agriculture in Amazonia, especially the social networks that urban garden products sustain; related are garden agro-diversity, re-conceptualization of the household as a multi-loci unit;
    • Amazonian dark-earth formation in homegardens;
    • floodplain sedimentation and lake formation in the Amazon River;
    • environmental history of Amazon floodplain forests and land-use;
    • social and cultural impacts of outmigration in Central Mexico.

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    Scott R. Winterstein
    Department: Fisheries & Wildlife
    E-mail: winterst@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.fw.msu.edu/people/faculty.php

    Scott R. Winterstein teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the areas of wildlife population dynamics and management and wildlife biometry. His research focuses on the development and assessment of techniques to estimate population parameters of wild vertebrate populations. For the past seven years he has been involved in work related to the control of infectious diseases of wild and domestic animals. The wildlife disease research has focused on relating the behavior of white-tailed deer to short and long-term human-induced environmental changes and how these behavioral/environmental interactions impact the movement of diseases through the landscape.

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    Warren W. Wood
    Department: Geological Sciences
    E-mail: wwwood@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.glg.msu.edu/people/wood.html

    Warren Wood (BS, MS, and PhD, MSU) is Visiting Professor of Geosciences at MSU; Adjunct Professor, King Fahd University, Saudi Arabia; Visiting Research Associate, School of Geography, University of Oxford, UK; Adjunct Professor, University of Nebraska; and Scientist Emeritus with the U. S. Geological Survey. During 40 years with the USGS, he served as: Project Chief hydrodynamic dispersion, Assistant Chief radioactive waste, Geochemist for the High Plains artificial recharge project, and a Hydrogeologist for the Michigan District. For the last 30 years his research interests have been largely in the hydrogeology of arid areas.

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    Felicia Wu
    Department: Food Science & Human Nutrition
    E-mail: fwu@msu.edu

    Dr. Felicia Wu is a graduate of Harvard University and most recently served as associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Pittsburgh. Wu has been a Distinguished Lecturer in the Toxicology Seminar Series in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. She is a Hannah Distinguished Professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a joint appointment in the Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics. Her research will focus on applying health economic and mathematical modeling techniques to understand the public health impacts of agricultural practices, both in the United States and worldwide.

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    Irene Xagoraraki
    Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering
    E-mail: xagorara@egr.msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.egr.msu.edu/cee/people/xagoraraki.html

    Irene Xagoraraki earned her Ph.D. (2001) and MS (1995) in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her BS degree (1993) from the University of the Aegean in Greece. Before coming to MSU she held a postdoctoral position at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests include drinking water safety, public health, and water quality engineering, with a particular focus on the detection, removal and inactivation of emerging biological and chemical contaminants in drinking water. Her recent research includes: occurrence of waterborne viruses in natural waters, fate of pharmaceuticals in water utilities, disinfection of enteric viruses in groundwater systems; inactivation of cyanobacterial toxins by chlorine, emerging pathogen removal in conventional water treatment processes, and coagulation and sedimentation of cryptosporidium parvum. The focus of her teaching is on water quality engineering.

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    Catherine H. Yansa
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: yansa@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/yansa.html

    My research focuses on reconstructing past environments in north-central North America since the last glacial maximum (over the last ~20,000 years) by studying plant fossils (pollen and plant macrofossils) preserved in lake sediments. The objectives and implications of my research are:

    • to document past responses of plants to climate changes at various temporal and spatial scales and use these as analogs for potential responses of plants to predicted global warming; and
    • to interpret the landscape contexts for prehistoric Native American occupations to explore long-term human-environment interactions

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    Runsheng Yin
    Department: Forestry
    E-mail: yinr@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.for.msu.edu/pages/faculty/yin_r.html

    Dr. Yin's research interests fall into two broad areas - international forestry and forest business management. Included in the former are the impact of economic reform on forestry development, sustainable forest management, agroforestry and plantation forestry, forest products trade. Included in the latter are timberland ownership and forest investment, efficiency and productivity measurement of the wood products industry, timber market dynamics, decision making under uncertainty. Funded by the NSF and the USDA, his recent research has engaged in assessing the impacts of China's ecological restoration programs, developing a market modeling system for China's forest sector, and investigating the forest tenure reform in China. In addition to many book chapters, he has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles in such journals as World Development, Forest Science, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Canadian journal of Forest Research. He teaches Forestry in International Development and Economics of Renewable Resources.

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    Wei Zhang
    Department: Crop and Soil Sciences
    E-mail: weizhang@msu.edu

    ESPP Profile

    Wei Zhang is an assistant professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences. He is broadly interested in the quality and sustainability of soil and water resources, with emphasis on the movement of water, solutes (e.g., nutrients, agrochemicals, and environmental toxics), and fine particles such as microorganisms, abiotic colloids, and engineered nanomaterials in natural and engineered systems, particularly in unsaturated soils. The overarching goal of his research activities is to promote protection of soil and water resources and sustainable agricultural production through understanding of fundamental transport processes and scientifically-sound management practices.

    Prior to joining MSU, he held a prestigious National Research Council Research Associateship hosted by USEPA. Wei received his Ph.D. degree in Environmental Engineering from Cornell University in 2010, his MS degree in Biosystems Engineering from Oklahoma State University in 2006, and his bachelor’s degree in Environmental Chemistry from Nanjing University in 2000.

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    Jinhua Zhao
    Department: Economics; Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
    E-mail: jzhao@msu.edu
    Web site: http://econ.msu.edu/faculty/zhao/index.php

    Jinhua is the director of ESPP and holds appointments in the Department of Economics and the Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics. He was a co-editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (2005-07) and is on the editorial council of JEEM and the Review of Development Economics.

    Research interests include: Natural resource and environmental economics, applied micro theory, global climate change, energy economics, trade and environment, real option theory, technology adoption, dynamic decision making.

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    Shiyan (Sharon) Zhong
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: zhongs@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/zhong.html

    I am an associate professor in the Department of Geography. My research interests lie primarily in improving our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and mesoscale processes with an emphasis on those induced by topography and landscape heterogeneity. Combining numerical modeling with field measurements, I have studied a wide-ranging atmospheric processes and phenomena. Examples include sea land breezes in the Gulf Coast, the low-level jets in the Great Plains, Washoe Zephyr in the Great Basin, gap flows in Mexico City basin, cold air pools in the Columbia Basin and Salt Lake Valley, and katabatic winds in Eastern Antarctica. I am also interested in smoke transport and dispersion from prescribed and wild fires and regional impact of climate change especially on the Great Lakes region.

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    Leo C. Zulu
    Department: Geography
    E-mail: zulu@msu.edu
    Web site: http://www.geo.msu.edu/faculty/zulu.html

    Dr. Zulu's research interests include political ecology, environment and development, community-based natural resources management in rural Africa, deforestation, food security, socio-spatial, temporal and biophysical processes of land use and land cover change in Africa and the techniques that permit their examination including Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems, and vulnerability and adaptation of rural communities in southern Africa to climate change.

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    Adam Zwickle
    Department: Criminal Justice
    E-mail: zwicklea@msu.edu

    Adam Zwickle conducts interdisciplinary social science research centered on communicating environmental risks and encouraging sustainable behaviors. Drawing from the fields of social psychology and risk communication, his work integrates theories of individual perception and message framing to aide communication practitioners. Specifically, his goal is to better communicate environmental risks in ways that reduce the amount that their long term impacts are discounted. He is also active in sustainability issues at the university level. He has worked with colleagues to develop a valid assessment of sustainability knowledge targeted at undergraduate students, partnered with university sustainability offices to increase conservation behaviors among students, and believes in using campuses as living laboratories to produce both theoretical and practical research as well as tangible local impacts.

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